What to do and see in Vidisha, India: The Best Places and Tips

December 8, 2017 Weston Hennigan

Vidisha in India, from Asia region, is best know for Caverns & Caves. Discover best things to do in Vidisha with beautiful photos and great reviews from traveller around the world here!

1. Udayagiri Caves

Near Vidisha Centre, Vidisha, India
Excellent
48%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
19%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 47 reviews

Udayagiri Caves

Reviewed By chow69 - Bhopal, India

The Udayagiri Caves are located near Vidisha North East of Bhopal. We visited these caves yesterday and were thrilled with some of the unique sculptures and figurines which were visible. There are almost 20 caves out of which one cave depicts a Jain sculpture, while the rest are Hindu caves. These caves feature some of the oldest Hindu images and cave temples in India. These rock-cut caves excavated into hillside have a great many sculptures from the early fifth century. The most notable sculpture is that of Vishnu, in his incarnation as the boar-headed Varaha. The sculpture shows Varaha rescuing earth represented by Bhudevi clinging to the boar's tusk. It is recommended that a guide is hired to explain the various caves and sculptures, even thought the Archaeological Department has put up boards at all the caves. Take adequate water and eatables while visiting the caves, for there is nothing available at the site.

2. Khamba Baba/Heliodorus Pillar

4 Km From Vidisha Railway Station, Vidisha, India
Excellent
26%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
26%
Poor
5%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 19 reviews

Khamba Baba/Heliodorus Pillar

Reviewed By jenabaintheworld - Washington DC, District of Columbia

We made a short 20 min stop to this pillar, which is supposedly from 300ish BC and erected by Greek ambassador to the area. see my other review of the site---listed near Bhopal.

3. Maladevi Temple

Gyaraspur, Vidisha, India
Excellent
51%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
16%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 6 reviews

Maladevi Temple

Reviewed By SingaporeGirl - Singapore

Well worth going off the beaten path to find this beautifully situated Jain/Buddhist/Hindu temple dating back to the 10-11C. Magnificently poised at the top of a hill overlooking the Valleys in three directions, you'll descend a set of steep but good stone stairs to find a ruined temple replete with statues relevant to all three ancient religions plus such features as a popular group of 'four footprints" of the gods: Rama, Sita, Lakshaman, and Hanuman. There were no other visitors the day I was there. Perfection in the clouds with the gods.

4. Vidisha District Museum

Sagar-Vidisha Road, Vidisha, India
Excellent
45%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
0%
Terrible
11%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

Vidisha District Museum

Reviewed By SingaporeGirl - Singapore

This small district museum is on the site of a massive temple that dates back to the 11C dedicated to Devi. There's a 2C BC statue of Kubera at the entrance. At some point a mosque was built on top of the site destroyed the tower(s) and the floor but there are enough statues and architectural features remaining that make a visit very interesting. Try to find a guide who can take you around and explain the site's history and special sites which are otherwise easy to miss.

5. Lohangi Pir

Near Vidisha Railway Station, Vidisha, India
Excellent
20%
Good
60%
Satisfactory
20%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 5 reviews

Lohangi Pir

Reviewed By thonburi - Bhopal

Since my last visit 18 months ago, the place has undergone a lot of improvements done by the MP Tourism Authorities. Place is a lot cleaner, better maintained and inviting visitors to have a seat on one of several benches to watch the city from above.

6. Udayeshwara Temple

Udaipur Village, Basoda Tehsil, Vidisha, India
Excellent
33%
Good
67%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 3 reviews

Udayeshwara Temple

Reviewed By 842chetans - Gurugram (Gurgaon), India

Udayeshwara temple is fine piece of art & history. This temple has beautifully carved stones & monuments & is a must visit.

7. Hindola Torana

Gyaraspur Tehsil, Vidisha, India
Excellent
67%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 3 reviews

Hindola Torana

Reviewed By Dilip S - Vadodara, India

Gyaraspur, located about 35 km from Vidisha , in north east is a small town of significant historical importance. There are remains of few temples, a half-rock-cut and half structural Jain shrine and a Buddhist stupa as well. This shows the secular nature of this town in old days. Going up on the hill for Mala Devi temple , one can find Hindola Torana , belonging to a ruined Vishnu Temple , now known as Char Khamba , on left side . The temple faced east but the torana is on north south axis and provides access to the temple from south .
The square ( bhadraka ) pillars of the torana rest on a lotus socle ( padmapitha ) and base ( kumbhaka ) . On both the pillars ten incarnations Vishnu are intricately carved . On the eastern pillar , Matsya and Kurma are shown on the northern side , Kurma is shown sitting on Mandarachal mountain which was used to churn the ocean . Four celestial deities are shown on the top part of the panel . Varaha , shown in alidhasana posture, with four hands , carrying a gada (club) and sankha (conch) in two of his hands is to the west . One right hand is placed on his thighs in katyavalambita mudra and one left hand , shoulder of which is carrying Bhudevi , carries chakra (disc) . Bhudevi is sitting on at the arm with one of her hand on the muzzle of Varaha . Varaha's left feet is placed over a pedestal , beneath which are shown two fishes , symbolizing an ocean . The pose represents Varaha coming out of an ocean carrying the goddess on his shoulder . Narsimha in the sourthen niche is shown with four hands , two hands tearing the belly of Hiranyakashipu , who is placed on his thighs, and two upper hands were perhaps for holding the intestine as a garland . There is a prabha-valaya (halo) behind his head . Vamana to the east is shown unusually with four hands, carrying sankha , chakra , gada and padma . There is yajnopavita around his body , signifying his Brahmanical character .
On the western pillar , Parashurama in the sourthen niche is shown with two hands carrying a parasu ( axe ) and ankusha ( elephant's goad ) .
Rama carrying a danush ( bow ) on his left shoulder and a bana (arrow) in two hands is shown in the western niche . Hanumana is shown down right side in anjali mudra . Buddha and Kalki are in the northern niche . Buddha is shown standing, his robe is carved very beautifully . Right to him, down the base, is shown Kalki , riding on a horse and carrying a sword .
Perhaps Krishna is in the eastern niche , as he is shown standing crossed legs and it seems there is a snake hood above the head .
Above these there are two registers with mithunas , dancers and musicians , a narrow recessed band of diamonds separate the two registers . Next an ornament comprising of vase and foliage ( ghatpallava ) above entwined serpents ( nagapasha ) is topped by the kirtimukha and vyalas and a half diamond ( ardharatna ) with surrounding scroll ornament . Further up is the fluted portion ( bharana ) and next , atlantid ( kumara ) and vyala brackets .Upon these rest the attic pillars with amalaka capitals and brackets supporting architraves with leafy scrolls emanating from kirtimukha at the centre . Above this a row of deities in niches alternate with devotees and is topped by an upper row of figures with an overhanging gagaraka lacing .

Varaha is shown on the above central niche, while Bhudevi is shown seated on his shoulder . Below lintel shows many gods , demi-gods in various niches . The attractive makar-torana is made up of two full arches coming out of makaras on either side . The arches are made up of flying celestials, instead of flower-creepers . There is a void at the meeting point of the arches , which suggests that there might have been something , like a swing , attached to this at some time in that past.

bracket, on the top of the pillar . After thoroughly appreciating Hindola torana we moved to char khamba . The pillars of this mandapa are pretty heavily carved and topped with vyala , Lion and elephant brackets like capital . Apsaras are shown standing in between niches in various postures .
Our next destination was Maladevi temple .

8. Heliodorus Pillar

Near Modern Besnagar, Vidisha, India
Excellent
0%
Good
60%
Satisfactory
40%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 5 reviews

Heliodorus Pillar

Reviewed By Rak990 - Bhopal, India

Very few of us know that India had close Greek connections. Alexander had returned but Greek mingled with India on its north-western borders. One Greek named Heliodorus came from Taxila to visit Vidisha, now in Madhya Pradesh, to meet local king some 150 years before Christ. He had erected a pillar in the name of a Hindu god. The inscription in Brahmi came to be deciphered recently. Till then, locals kept on worshiping this pillar as Khambh Baba (Pillar Diety) now known as Heliodorus Pillar.
There are very few visitors to this ancient site, situated just outside Vidisha town across Bens river. It is very close to world famous site of Sanchi stupa, just about 15 kilometers from here.One can feel the Greeko-Indian connections after visiting this site, which is generally secluded from outside world.

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