What to do and see in Surry, United States: The Best Places and Tips

August 5, 2017 Sheron Bogner

Surry (formerly Cross Roads, McIntosh's Cross Roads, McIntoshs Cross Roads, Scuffletown, Smithville, Surry Court House, and The Crossroads) is an incorporated town in Surry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 244 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Surry County. Its name is derived from the historic county of Surrey in England.
Restaurants in Surry

1. Colonial Williamsburg

101 Visitor Center Drive, Williamsburg, VA 23185-4565 +1 855-392-8473
Excellent
67%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 10 reviews

Colonial Williamsburg

Discover Colonial Williamsburg and become a citizen of the Revolutionary City. Engage with the local community and experience firsthand the daily struggles of wartime. Explore our art museums, unleash your kids' inner colonists, tee off a game of golf, or relax and unwind at the Spa. Stay at one of the official Colonial Williamsburg hotels, with a variety of opportunities to shop and dine, and you'll never want to leave.

Reviewed By Roger K - Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

A little off season, so we were able to park in town rather than at the visitor center, from which we would have had to take the tram. Lots of activities were going. Wythe House is a good visit. Ate lunch in the patio behind Chowning's; good, but a little pricey.

2. Colonial Parkway

Yorktown, VA
Excellent
77%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 583 reviews

Colonial Parkway

Reviewed By Rockiroads - Oshawa, Canada

A very nice drive. We seemed to be on this parkway many times visiting the old villages and touring historic sites and monuments. The roads created in a bit of an old style of highway building being very scenic, it the trees, little shoulders, lots of cool bridge going underneath them and the road itself sort of stone looking. Great drives some look outs.

3. Jamestown-Scotland Ferry

16289 Rolfe Hwy, Surry, VA 23883-3102
Excellent
85%
Good
14%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 148 reviews

Jamestown-Scotland Ferry

Reviewed By Heelraiser - Raleigh, North Carolina

What’s not to like? It’s free, it’s punctual, it’s professionally operated, and it gets you across the James. Just sit in your car or get out and birdwatch. It’s all good!

4. Bacon's Castle

465 Bacons Castle Trl, Surry, VA 23883-2213 +1 757-357-5976
Excellent
65%
Good
27%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 293 reviews

Bacon's Castle

The Castle provides Guided Tours, Gift Shopping, & Tourist Information on Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays between 10 a.M. And 5 p.M. And Sundays between 12 and 5 p.M. Grounds are open 365 days a year between dawn and dusk. Built in 1665, Bacon's Castle, originally known as the Arthur Allen Brick House, is British North America's oldest brick structure, North America's only surviving example of Jacobean Architecture, and has North America's oldest, preserved 17th-century English Formal Garden. Since 1973, Preservation Virginia restores, preserves, and presents the 40-acre historic site as a museum. The Site has a gift shop, restrooms, tourist information desk, guided house tours, Oldest Tidewater Virginia Barn (early-18th-century), 1850s Smokehouse, 1829/1849 Slave Quarters, and self-guided grounds and garden tours. Preservation Virginia's Bacon's Castle is proud to announce it is a Virginia Green certified Attraction and encourages others to participate in responsible practices. The grounds are accessible 364 days of the year between dawn and dusk.

Reviewed By J David H - Virginia Beach, Virginia

Wealthy merchant and planter Arthur Allen built a Jacobean style home in 1665. The architecture and story of an early rebellion by frontier fighters highlighted my two visits to Surry County to tour the castle. Known as the oldest surviving brick home in North America it is only one of three surviving Jacobean "Great Houses" West of the Atlantic. Saying Allen's home is rare is an understatement. The volunteers that have conducted my tours have been knowledgeable about the home and family.

Bacon's Castle has nothing to do with a meat, or even a resident that ever resided at the 17th Century estate. The name is derived from Nathaniel Bacon whose followers led a revolt and fortified the house and vast property in 1676. Bacon's group held the home for a reported three months as a fort before the band of fighters were squashed by the Royal Governor, Sir William Berkeley. Although possible Bacon was at the home during this period there is no evidence he ever resided there. The uprising at the property was known as Bacon's Rebellion and its present day name was first applied in the Virginia Gazette in the Capital City of Williamsburg 1769.

The 19th Century history of the house brought a two story Greek Revival wing, a change in the entry way from the center block and Diamond Pane casement windows replaced for double hung. The changes were left intact in its present day. Visitors can view the scars left from the original pedimented surround of the entry.

Preservation Virginia was able to acquire the unique holding and surrounding property in 1974. It took nine years to rehabilitate and complete research of the residence and families who lived in it. Guided tours began in 1983 and continue to run March - December. A cellphone tour is also available when the property is closed. A museum store is on site in the newer wing of the home.

Last I toured the formal gardens they were rough. Significant work has been done by the Garden Club of Virginia to restore their 17th Century beauty. During that last visit my son and I assisted with a dig that would have been outside the 18th Century kitchen. A few pottery items were recovered that day.

Bacon’s Castle offers something for everyone in the family. The architecture of the home, family story of Arthur Allen and the siege on the house by Bacon’s rebels make this a must tour. I recommend warmer climate days in order to take in the outbuilding slave quarters. The gardens would be best viewed in Spring and Summer.

5. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum

325 W Francis St, Williamsburg, VA 23185-4103 +1 757-220-7693
Excellent
78%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 579 reviews

Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum

19th-century folk household objects (toys, kitchenware, paintings, furniture, etc.) are on display at the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum.

Reviewed By EatLoveTravel17 - Williamsburg, Virginia

Locals and visitors alike will certainly enjoy at least one visit to this marvelous museum per year. There is definitely something for everyone to see and appreciate. 19th Century Toys, collectibles, textiles, furniture, whirligigs and ornaments are just some of the unique early American treasures you will discover. If you are visiting during the summer or fall, recommend visiting in the mid-morning or a late afternoon. It's one of several locations we always recommend to family and friends when they inquire "What to Do & See in Williamsburg".

6. Historic Jamestowne

1368 Colonial Pkwy, Jamestowne, Williamsburg, VA 23081-0001 +1 757-856-1250
Excellent
75%
Good
19%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 4 reviews

Historic Jamestowne

Historic Jamestowne is the original site of the first permanent English settlement in America. Ongoing archaeology at the site of James Fort has changed our understanding of the struggles and triumphs of early 1600s life in Virginia. Living history programs and an archaeology museum tell the story of this dramatic rediscovery. The site is jointly administered by the National Park Service and Preservation Virginia.

Reviewed By phosford - Huntersville, North Carolina

Jamestown is a fascinating place to visit but plan to spend 5-6 hours there. Any less time and you'll miss too much. Jamestown has two parts: the original site of the Jamestown colony with the archeologic digs and a fantastic museum with artifacts. This is a National Park location. The second part is a recreation of what the colony may have looked like including an Indian village. Lots of demonstrations on how people lived in 1607. Very friendly docents and artesians. Because it is a National Park your kids can do the Junior Ranger program and earn a badge. I found doing this keeps the kids engaged much longer and much deeper than just wandering through the exhibits.

7. Chippokes Plantation State Park

695 Chippokes Park Rd, Surry, VA 23883-2406 +1 757-294-3625
Excellent
70%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 136 reviews

Chippokes Plantation State Park

Located only 6 miles from Surry Courthouse and 15 miles from Colonial Williamsburg and Victorian Smithfield, the 1,947-acre Chippokes Plantation State Park invites visitors to explore thousands of years of natural and Native American and over 394 years of African and European American histories while basking on James River sun-kissed beaches, relaxing amidst nature and a roaring campfire, and visiting other regional attractions. In the same year Africans were first brought to Jamestown, in 1619 Captain William Powell was granted his patent for Chippokes Plantation. By 1626 Chippokes Plantation became a working farm and to this day remains an operational agricultural enterprise. Between April and October visitors may tour the 1854 Jones-Stewart Victorian Mansion and eight, beautifully-appointed exhibit rooms showcase how people decorated and lived in the years before the American Civil War. The Mansion hosts periodic Hearth Cooking Demonstrations at its detached Summer Kitchen. Please check for program details. During Summer months take guided walking tours of "Quarter Lane". Located adjacent to the 1816 Antebellum Riverhouse visitors follow in the footsteps of enslaved African Americans and their contributions to building America during this informative African-American Heritage Program. Please check for program details. Overnight guests may choose between four cabins and fifty water and electric campsites. Reservations are recommended.

Reviewed By pollyqc99 - Pennsylvania

We recently camped at Chippokes for a week in our pop-up camper. We have never been to the area, and we were pleasantly surprised by how nice this state park is. We stayed in the B loop and had water and electric hook up. The bathrooms and showers were so CLEAN. This was the nicest state park campground we have ever visited. It is a smaller park, so it was peaceful and quiet mid-week. Even when it got busy on the weekend, people were generally quiet and respectful. My only complaint is that it is a dog friendly campground, and some pet owners do not pick up after their animals or allow them to bark all day long.

We visited the James River beach several times, and my husband took the opportunity to fish while there. There are a ton of shells here, so it makes exploring an interesting experience. The agricultural/farming display was very fascinating. We toured the mansion as well, but I enjoyed the farming equipment more!

The park is about 10 minutes from the ferry in Surry which takes you to Williamsburg and Yorktown. We made use of that several times during our trip and enjoyed the experience.

Overall, I would return again in the future. We truly enjoyed our stay.

8. Smith's Fort Plantation

217 Smith Fort Ln, Surry, VA 23883-2910 +1 757-294-3872
Excellent
76%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 85 reviews

Smith's Fort Plantation

Smith's Fort Plantation is nestled on the south side of the James River, located on the site of Captain John Smith's planned "New Fort", on the land given by Chief Powhatan as a dowry for his daughter Pocahontas upon her marriage to John Rolfe. The 18th century manor house retains much of its original woodwork and provides examples of early American and English period furnishings from the late 16th through the early 18th centuries. Built sometime between 1751 and 1765, this story-and-a-half Flemish bond brick house was home to Jacob Faulcon and his family. The name "Smith's Fort Plantation" comes from the fact that John Smith began construction of a second fort on this site in 1608. Smith's Fort offered a strategic location for a retreat fort away from the original settlement, but construction was abandoned early due to starving conditions at the first fort and conflicts with the local Native American tribe. A few years later after the successful union of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, the bride's father, Wahunsenacawh, was the paramount chief of Tsenacommacah (In 1607, the English colonists were introduced to Wahunsenacawh as Powhatan and understood this latter name to come from Powhatan's hometown near the falls of the James River near present-day Richmond, Virginia.), Gave his new son-in-law a grant of this land as a dowry gift. Although the couple never lived on site, their only son, Thomas Rolfe, later returned to Virginia and opened a tobacco plantation on over 400 acres of the property.

Reviewed By VW49 - Ashburn, Virginia

We visited here as a diversion from the better known attractions near Williamsburg. After an enjoyable, free ride across the James River on the Jamestown-Scotland ferry we bought combined tickets to Smith's Fort Plantation and Bacon's Castle for $12 (senior rate). The manor house is amazing in its preservation of the 18th century building with period furnishings. Our guide Tom provided a very informative and fun tour of the house that even kept the youngsters in the group interested and attentive. The gardens are also very nice and then there is Capt. Smith's retreat fort site which now is really just a marker and slight clearing with a nice overlook of the river. The gift shop in the house basement offered very nice items at reasonable prices.

9. Colonial National Historic Park

1368 Colonial Pkwy, Williamsburg, VA 23081-0001 +1 757-898-2410
Excellent
85%
Good
12%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 189 reviews

Colonial National Historic Park

Reviewed By ChrisfromDE - Wilmington, Delaware

during a recent stay in Williamsburg, we visited the National Park Service's sites at Yorktown and Jamestown. The Park Service visitor center admission of $7/person included a 90 minute presentation by a Park Service officer who took us around the site and explained the timeline of the siege of Yorktown and the surrender of Cornwallis. She explained why the British camped at Yorktown, the various lines of defense, the tactics employed by the American and French Allies against the British and how the allies forced the British surrender. An excellent presentation. The Yorktown Visitor Center has a small but impressive museum as well. At the Visitor Center, we bought a cd with a driving tour of other sites scattered around the battlefield, which was about another hour. Great idea, since the battlefield is spread out.
We spent another afternoon at the National Park facility at Jamestown. Again, a great facility, with an informative museum and guides. We joined a tour by an archaeologist working on the site. It was amazing that it had been assumed that the original site had disappeared into the James River and it was not until 1994 that it was discovered that much of the site was still there. We learned a great deal and had a wonderful day looking at the excavations and artifacts.

10. College Run Farms

399 Alliance Rd, Surry, VA 23883-2635 +1 757-294-3970
Excellent
83%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
3%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 27 reviews

College Run Farms

Reviewed By Christina O - Norfolk, Virginia

several times we now stopped at this place and went back to the car quickly, today they had pumpkins more expensive than at Smithfiled farmers market and that was it, some pumpkin pie in the cold display but that was all - where were the farm products??? totally disappointed once again

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