What to do and see in Meknes, Morocco: The Best Places and Tips

July 22, 2017 Alida England

Overlooked by many tourists, Meknes is a bustling modern city of nearly a million in northern Morocco, about 80 miles inland from the capital of Rabat. Local hero Moulay Ismail made Meknes Morocco's hub at the end of the 17th and beginning of the 18th centuries, and his mausoleum is one of the city's main attractions. The Museum of Moroccan Art (housing fascinating jewels and artifacts) and Bab Mansour (the largest and most stunning of the city's gates) are other Meknes sights not to be missed.
Restaurants in Meknes

Meknes, Morocco +212 675-736666
Excellent
61%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 384 reviews

Volubilis

Reviewed By SeemsTVL - Dundee, United Kingdom

The Volubilis site can be reached by private taxi, tourbus or walking from Moulay Idriss. It is a medium -sized site that takes 1.5 - 2hrs to visit in reasonable depth. The entry fee is only 10 dirhrams
Remember to bring a hat and bottle of water. Of all the places I visited in Morcocco, this was my favourite

2. Bou Inania Medersa

Kabt Souk, Meknes 50000, Morocco
Excellent
54%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 179 reviews

Bou Inania Medersa

Reviewed By Stefano F

The Bou Inania Medersa is a jewel in the Meknes medina. Decoration is wonderful, very quiet (one can visit alone without guides) and a visit to the rooftop is worthwhile.

3. Bab Mansour Gate

17, Rue Ain El Anboub et Rue Lalla Aicha Adouia | Quartier HAMMAM JDID, Meknes 52000, Morocco
Excellent
37%
Good
47%
Satisfactory
14%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 443 reviews

Bab Mansour Gate

Reviewed By lynda m - Worcester, United Kingdom

Although it's only an entrance, it's magnificent! I'd advise getting a guide to explain all the history, metal work and mosaics. Because it's so near a busy road, there were many other tourists like us admiring it making it impossible to get a reasonable photo so try to admire it when it's less hectic.

4. Meknes Medina

Meknes, Morocco
Excellent
37%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
15%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 740 reviews

Meknes Medina

Reviewed By lynda m - Worcester, United Kingdom

Allow plenty of time to explore and try not to get lost if you're on a limited time. All the interesting little passages, everyone a photographers heaven, the smells, the noise, the people and the atmosphere are more intimate than the larger Medinas. Perfect in every way.

5. Mausoleum of Mouley Ismail

Rue Palais, Meknes, Morocco
Excellent
38%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
16%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 312 reviews

Mausoleum of Mouley Ismail

Reviewed By lynda m - Worcester, United Kingdom

We were on a tight schedule but called in here as part of a grand tour of the area and although we were unable to see all of it, the parts we saw were fabulous. The mosaics were amazing covering every available surface and, because it was quiet when we were there, the atmosphere was serene. Well worth a longer visit.

6. El Hedim Square

Ave Moulay Ismail, Meknes, Morocco
Excellent
29%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
21%
Poor
4%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 285 reviews

El Hedim Square

Reviewed By Samiya7 - Hollywood, Florida

This is a big square with restaurants and stalls selling Moroccan goods, spices, produce, meats, soaps and lots and lots of sweets that looked pretty good. We strolled around but did not buy anything.

7. Royal Stables

Meknes, Morocco
Excellent
28%
Good
54%
Satisfactory
14%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 110 reviews

Royal Stables

Reviewed By springbank - Greve, Denmark

This is truly a hidden gem in Morocco. Breath-taking ruins that will blow your mind away. The site is made up of two main areas. The first is the interior part which was used to store huge amounts of grain (not people). The exterior part of the complex also has rows of stone arches but it was used to as a royal stable to keep horses and other animals. This massive stable yard was constructed to comfortably house no less that twelve thousand of the royal horses. Today, most of the stables are in ruin and due to an earthquake during the eighteenth century, the roof of the stables no longer provides protection. Behind the royal stables granaries were built on a Reservoir and were designed to be able to store grain for the horse feed.

8. Sahrij Swani

4110 Bni M'hammed Alismailia, Meknes, Morocco
Excellent
34%
Good
44%
Satisfactory
20%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 112 reviews

Sahrij Swani

Reviewed By redeco - Warren, Massachusetts

This enormous Reservoir was built by Moulay Ismail to provide water for the Imperial City. The stables and granary are just beyond. This is a part of the city that is well-used by the public for promenades around the man-made lake. On weekends and holidays, there can be merchandise and snack vendors here as well.
A guidebook tells that the women from the harem sailed boats on this reservoir; and that soldiers trained here as well.
Enjoy

9. Dar Jamai Museum

Sahat El Hadim, Meknes, Morocco 212 5 53 08 63
Excellent
41%
Good
34%
Satisfactory
22%
Poor
1%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 98 reviews

Dar Jamai Museum

Reviewed By Bernard B - Paris, France

The décor is much better than the museum itself which exhibits lots of traditional craft and art work. The garden is simple but very nice. Some of the rooms evoke the grandeur of past owners. Worth to spend an hour there...

10. Bab El-Khemis Gate

Meknes 50030, Morocco +212 661-564081
Excellent
26%
Good
65%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 42 reviews

Bab El-Khemis Gate

Reviewed By springbank - Greve, Denmark

I think this is the most beautiful of the gates of the old city of Meknes, amazing magnificent structure. It is situated close to an area of the University and it is very well maintained with wonderful mosaics. The ancient wall stretched from it in both directions. Bab” is the Arabic word for gate and, of the 12 gates in the 12 kilometre long, rose-pink 12th-century wall that wraps around the ancient city, Bab el Kermis is one of the oldest. I have been told that it takes its name from the Thursday market where once camels, horses, mules and asses were sold.

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