What to do and see in Korsakov, Russia: The Best Places and Tips

August 9, 2017 Yuk Petri

Discover the best top things to do in Korsakov, Russia including Lake Busse, Viewing Point, Museum of History and Local Lore, Friary of Protection of the Holy Virgin, Monument at the Mountain Pechali, Lenin Square, Stadium Vodnik, Japanese War Monument, Ferry, Monument to the Crew of the Cruiser Novik.

1. Lake Busse

Korsakov, Sakhalin, Russia
Excellent
86%
Good
14%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 14 reviews

Lake Busse

Reviewed By evgo_khv - Khabarovsk, Russia

Кроме замечательного летнего отдыха на озере, здесь еще и отличная зимняя рыбалка на корюшку малоротку. У меня всегда вспоминается фраза из "Бриллиантовой руки": Клевать будет так, шо клиент позабудет обо всем на свете!

2. Viewing Point

Dachnaya St., Korsakov, Sakhalin, Russia
Excellent
41%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
17%
Poor
4%
Terrible
8%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 23 reviews

Viewing Point

Reviewed By adshare - Engadine, Australia

There is an unusual monument, which, I believe, is The Monument to Divided Families. This monument does give an interesting photo. The elevated viewing area, adjacent to the monument does give a view out to the Okhotsk Sea and over the Port of Korsakov. Interesting but I could not describe it as photogenic or beautiful.

3. Museum of History and Local Lore

Krasnoflotskaya ul., d. 22, Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia +7 424 352-12-00
Excellent
40%
Good
15%
Satisfactory
25%
Poor
20%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 20 reviews

Museum of History and Local Lore

Reviewed By roundtabler - Bangalore

Well the diamond princes sailed in and we trooped into Korsakov. Warm people in barren desolate and rather rundown outpost of Russia. They put on a little song and dance routine. Few photo ops with local traditionally dressed lovelies and over priced souvenirs. Perhaps one of the few remaining Lenin statues can be found here.

4. Friary of Protection of the Holy Virgin

Okruzhnaya st., 138, Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia +7 424 352-58-88
Excellent
33%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
22%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

Friary of Protection of the Holy Virgin

Reviewed By Andrew M

This monastery has the reputation of being the easternmost Russian monastery. We visited Korsakov, by taking Bus # 115 from Yuhzno Sakhalinsk. The bus to Korsakov is located to the left facing the train station. Large buses are scheduled at regular half hourly intervals, but it may be more efficient to take a Mashrutka (min bus) which is faster. The Mashrutkas do not have a schedule, and leave when full. We arrived at 7am and waited only 15 minutes before the bus departed. The bus fare is 30 ruble. The Monastery is on the left at the intersection of Okruzhnaya Street & Vokzalhaye Street. This will be the first attraction on entering Korsakov.
The monastery has an interesting history, as, it was known as the burial place for the Russian sailors of the cruiser Novik in 1904. The Japanese had blockaded the Rusian fleet in Port Arthur in 1904. A few ships, including the Novik, broke the blockade and escaped. The Novik took three hits, but managed to reach Qingdao ( a neutral German Port) Commander Von Schultz, whose statue is in the town square, sought to reach the safety of Vladivostok, but could not distance the pursuing Japanese ships, and had to fight in Aniva Bay off Korsakov. The Novik took a further 5 hits, and was ordered to be scuttled by Von Schultz, to prevent Japan taking his ship. This act was not successful, as the Japanese navy were able to salvage the ship the following year and add it to the Japanese fleet. We were very interested in this story, as we had visited Port Arthur, Dalian where the main battle took place, and Incheon where another Russian ship which broke the blockade was cornered and sunk. The Russian sailors who died in Incheon were buried in the main Vladivostok cemetery, which we had also visited.
After the Japanese occupied Korsakov in 1905, after the Treaty of Portsmouth was agreed, the premises was used as a house for Japanese officers. After the Russian victory in the Battle for Sakhalin in 1945, there were no improvements, until 1959 when the existing house was refurbished, and opened as a club for Russian Sailors, as is evidenced by the anchor on the gates to the right of the main entrance to the monastery, and an anchor high on a post where the building used to be. Only the foundation of the building remains.
The monastery did not return to it's religious standing until 1995. A short walk uphill will lead to the entrance of the monastery. We visited early in the morning, and it was closed.The monastery is cream coloured, with a green roof, at the peak of which is a small gold orthodox cross. Look out for a small wooden bell tower facing the monastery. It has a huge bell with a star on it, and also has a gold orthodox cross on top. We viewed graves on the hill to the left of the monastery, but could not determine which one was dedicated to the crew of the Novik. Entrance is free and photos may be taken. We didn't see any opening hours posted.
There are no other nearby attractions, and it may be best to take the "loop bus" # 1 into town. The bus costs 15 ruble, and runs a regular schedule which is posted at each bus stop. If you decide to walk, it is a long 3 kilometers to town, with not much to see. If you are really interested in the Russo Japan war history, a monument to Japanese soldiers who died in the 1945 battle is located in a cemetery on Nagornaya Street, which is 2 kilometers, in the direction of town, from the monastery.

5. Monument at the Mountain Pechali

Korsakov, Sakhalin, Russia
Excellent
39%
Good
37%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
0%
Terrible
12%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 8 reviews

Monument at the Mountain Pechali

Reviewed By Andrew M

This monument, known as the monument to the forgotten Koreans, is dedicated to the 43,000 Koreans in Sakhalin, who were refused repatriation to Japan or Korea at the end of World War 2. They are also known as the Sakhalin Koreans, who mainly came from Gyeongsang and Jeolla provinces in South Korea. There was a peak of 150,000 Koreans working in the coal mines and lumber yards on Sakhalin. After the Russian invasion in 1945, most Japanese were allowed to return to Japan, the Koreans that were allowed to leave settled in Japan or North Korea. In the 1930's.many Koreans were deported from North Sakhalin by Russia, who didn't trust their "relationship" with Japan. It is said that the Russians refused the repatriation of the remaining Koreans to ensure that there were workers to continue the functioning industries in Southern Sakhalin, following the departure of the Japanese. Over the years most of the remaining Koreans took North Korean citizenship, rather than remain stateless, and approx 1/3 took Russian citizenship.
The monument is located on Primorskiy Boulevard overlooking the Ferry Terminal and Port Adminstration building. The easiest method of reaching here is by taking bus # 4, which costs 15 ruble, and stops at the monument. An alternative, is to walk the 1/2 kilometer, up a slight slope, from the round a bout at the main bus stop in town. We took the most difficult route, which was to climb up a very steep dirt path which was directly in front of the ferry terminal building, and led to the car park where the monument is located. The view from the monument area is great, and we thought that it was better than the "observation deck", where most tourists visit on Dachnaya Street. The monument is comprised of two tall sculptures which seem to be divided in half, the top of which is in a heart shape.A perimeter chain is around the monument base and there are four grey plaques, two on each side of the monument. The plaques had inscriptions in Russian and Korean.We had visited Korea many times, and were quite familiar with the period of the Japanese occupation between 1905-1945, the Japnese invasions of Korea in the 16th century, and the Gangwha Island incident in the 1860's.
The annexation of Korea by Japan was done by the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, which was "one sided", as it was not signed by Korea.Japan renamed the new empire as Chosen.This colonisation was oppressive, and included the marginalization of the Korean culture and language, and the destruction of many important historical treasures, such as ancient palaces. The Japanese drafted the National Mobilization Law 1938 which was aimed at getting Japan "war ready", and over 5 million Korean workers were conscripted by forced or other means. Some of these workers were relocated to Karafuto (southern sakhalin). The Japanese had many Koreans on the island since 1905, as Karafuto was used as a forced labour camp for Korean prisoners, who were detained for defying Japan colonisation. Korsakov was also used by the Russians as a forced labour camp in the 1800's. The estimated Korean war deaths were over 1/2 million, of which approx. 70,000 died in the atomic bombing of Japan.
This monument is a must see if you are interested in Asian history, and is not much visited, so you can relax and see the beautiful views of the bay. There are a few shops in this area for refreshments, and the Bus # 4 will take you back to the center of town. Nearby attractions include, the Novik cruiser monument at the port/ferry terminal gate, the old karafuto bank, railway lines,port buildings and Wakkanay Square.The monument is accessible 24 hours per day, free of cost and pictures may be taken.

6. Lenin Square

Korsakov, Sakhalin, Russia
Excellent
10%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
60%
Poor
10%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 20 reviews

Lenin Square

Reviewed By BALI2007BALI - King's Lynn, United Kingdom

This square was dedicated to Lenin the Russia Ruler where a large statue occupies part of this square.

7. Stadium Vodnik

Parkovaya 1A, Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia
Excellent
50%
Good
50%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 2 reviews

Stadium Vodnik

Reviewed By andrei k - Moscow, Russia

Стадион проезжали в рамках поездки в монастырь,нечего примечательного в нем нет-чистый,уютный,провинциальный.Для занятий спортом подходит на все сто процентов,популярен думаю в теплое время года.

8. Japanese War Monument

Nagornaya St., Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia
Excellent
0%
Good
100%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 1 reviews

Japanese War Monument

Reviewed By Andrew M

This monument is one of the few Japanese monuments in Korsakov. It is dedicated to the fallen in the Battle of Sakhalin in 1945. It is located 1 kilometer out of town in a northerly direction. It is probably easiest to walk, although a few buses traverse this route. Walk north on Okruzhnaya Street, then turn right on Nagornaya Street. The Apartments at # 7 Nagornaya Street will come into view, and at this point you should turn left The road will slop gently upward, and you should walk on the right hand side of the road which has the sidewalk. At the top of the slope, the local cemetery will be in view on the left. Continue walking for another five minutes, and a dirt path on the left will be seen, The Japanese monument is at the end of this path.
The concrete path leading to the monument has three flower beds on either side which have pink and yellow flowers. The monument is surrounded by a small black metal perimeter fence. The monument is grey and tapered to the top which has a pyramid shaped top, and a black plaque at the front with Japanese kanji.The monument was dedicated in 1993, and has a plaque on it's rear that has both Russian and Japanese inscriptions. Two smaller Japanese monuments are to the right of the main monument. Korsakov was the last town to fall in the Battle of Sakhalin in 1945, There was fierce fighting near to the 50th parallel, but after Pobedino and Khomsk fell, the Japanese resistance on Sakhalin was futile. The approx. 3,400 Japanese troops surrendered in Korsakov. Most of the Japanese were transferred to Gulag's in Siberia. We had visited Komsomolsk on Amur, where most of the Japanese POW's were held.
When the Russians claimed Korsakov in 1945 nearly all of the Japanese buildings were destroyed, as was the case when the Russians handed over Southern Sakhalin to the Japanese in 1905, in accordance with the treaty of Portsmouth. The remaining Japanese structures in Korsakov, are the shinto shrine to the left of the Police Station on Krasnoflotskaya Street, the Karafuto Bank at the intersection of Oktyabr'skaya and Sovetskaya Street, the old railway station and port area opposite the Karafuto Bank, and monuments on the hill opposite the railway station and at Prigorodnoye, near to the liquid gas plant. If you are interested in Japanese history on Sakhalin a visit to the monument is a must. The Japanese monument is accessible 24 hours per day, free of cost and photos may be taken.

9. Ferry

Portovaya St., 10, Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia
Excellent
0%
Good
100%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 1 reviews

Ferry

Reviewed By Andrew M

The ferry is the best way to travel to Japan from Korsakov. The ferry terminal is at the front of the port administration building on Portovaya Street. Bus # 4 stops in front of the ferry terminal, and costs 15 ruble. Tickets for the ferry ride to Wakkanai cannot be purchased at the terminal building. The tickets are available at Bitomo Travel Agency on 1 - 1 Sakhalinskaya St., Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. The ferry runs between June and September, and tickets have to be bought at least one day in advance. The trip by ferry offers great views of the south west coast of Sakhalin, and then at sea through the Strait of La Perouse (named after the famous French explorer Jean Francois La Perouse). The trip takes four (4) hours and the ferry is air conditioned with a few air beds for resting and chairs for persons who want to watch videos or movies.
We found the procedure and local customs to be very efficient. We were worried about buying local vodka and caviar paste from the shop located opposite the ferry terminal, as we were unable to get a receipt and thought that it would have been a problem. Other passengers bought Russian beer, vodka and local snacks without showing any receipts, so we were disappointed at this error. A bus does the transfer between the ferry building and the ferry port which is approx. 1 kilometer drive on the pier. Travel by plane is probably more efficient, but we thought that the ferry service was a great experience.
A monument to the crew of the Novik Cruiser which was sunk in Aniva Bay by the Japanese is in front of the Ferry Terminal. If you look up on the hill directly in front of the ferry terminal, there is a monument to the Sakhalin Koreans, known as the "forgotten Koreans monument".

10. Monument to the Crew of the Cruiser Novik

Portovaya St., 10, Korsakov, Sakhalin 694020, Russia
Excellent
0%
Good
100%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 1 reviews

Monument to the Crew of the Cruiser Novik

Reviewed By Andrew M

The Novik cruiser was one of the many Russian ships that were blockaded by the Japanese at Port Arthur in 1904 during the Russo Japan war. The Novik sustained light damaes in the initial skirmishes at the start of the Japanese blockade, and had to be repaired in harbour. Admiral Makarov who was head of the navy, took command of the cruiser. We had visited his statue in Vladivostok. Makarov was transferred to the larger cruiser Petropavlovsk, and Max von Shultz was appointed captain. The Novik eventually managed to escape the blockade along with a few other ships, despite being hit three times. She sailed to Qindao, China which was a neutral port managed by Germany. Fearing attack in this port, Von Shultz tried to reach Vladivostok, trusting that the speed of his ship would keep him ahead of his Japanese pursuers.
The Japanese caught sight of the Novik heading to Korsakov, by way of a lighthouse in the Kuriles.. The Novik could not complete the journey to Vladivostok without coal supplies, and had just departed Korsakov when the Japanese ships were sighted.During the short battle, the Novik sustained five hits and Von Shultz ordered the ship to be scuttled rather than fall into Japanese hands. This was not successful, as the Japanese salvaged the ship one year later, and it became a part of the Japanese fleet.There were two Russian fatalities during the battle. The 8 officers and 270 men traveled for 45 days through mostly wild terrain before reaching Vladivostok, which was 400 miles away.
The monument is a tribute to the bravery, loyalty and dedication exhibited by the crew of the Novik. It is located next to the main Port Administration and Ferry building. A tiled path leads to the monument. On either side of which is a stone with a black anchor. The monument is on a broad base, and is a columnar shape which tapers to the top. A cross stands at the top of the monument.At the area where the monument meets the base is a plaque which had Russian inscriptions, and reads "heroes of war" and states the year of the Russo Japan war 1904-1905 underneath. The name Novik is in bold Russian letters on the pink tiled section near the base of the monument. There are two other plaques on the monument, on the right side, a plaque states the date that the Novik was scuttled, 28 August 1904, and the rear of the monument has a relief of the cruiser at sea, and Russian inscriptions above.
The two dead sailors on the Novik were laid to rest at the Monastery on Okruzhnaya Street, which is near to the entrance of town. It is a long walk, and I would advise taking the Loop Bus # 1, which does the trip around town every 15 minutes in both directions.We had visited Port Arthur in Dalian, and had also visited Incheon where another Russian cruiser which escaped Port Arthur was sunk. A memorial to the Incheon dead is at the Port of Incheon, and the sailors remains were laid to rest in a small park with a monument in Gaydamakskiy, Vladivostok which we had also visited. If you are interested in the Russo Japan war, this monument is a must visit. it is accessible 24 hours per day, free of cost and photos may be taken.

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