Top 10 Things to do in Waltham, United States

July 26, 2017 Vivienne Hutton

Waltham (/ˈwɔːlθæm/) is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, and was an early center for the labor movement as well as a major contributor to the American Industrial Revolution. The original home of the Boston Manufacturing Company, the city was a prototype for 19th century industrial city planning, spawning what became known as the Waltham-Lowell system of labor and production. The city is now a center for research and higher education, home to Brandeis University and Bentley University. The population was 60,636 at the census in 2010.
Restaurants in Waltham

1. Mount Auburn Cemetery

580 Mount Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138-5529 +1 617-547-7105
Excellent
79%
Good
17%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 541 reviews

Mount Auburn Cemetery

Mount Auburn Cemetery was founded in 1831 as America's first landscaped cemetery. A National Historic Landmark, its renowned landscape inspired the creation of the nation's public parks. Mount Auburn was designated an Important Bird Area by the Massachusetts Audubon Society, reinforcing its status as a significant wildlife sanctuary. Still an active burial place, Mount Auburn Cemetery provides comfort and solace to countless families. The Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery was established in 1986 to assist in the conservation of the Cemetery's natural beauty and to promote the appreciation of its cultural, historic, and natural resources. Over 100 public programs are offered annually by the Friends to educate, enrich, and inspire the community. The Friends seeks financial support for education and interpretive programs and materials for the public, specific cultural projects, and operational support for horticultural rejuvenation and the preservation of the historic monuments, structures, and archival artifacts and records.

Reviewed By Callisto S - S. Natick, MA

Went during the Spring during the warbler migration and had some luck spotting various warblers, orioles, hawks and other birds! The variety of plantings around the differently landscaped grave areas give the feel of different environmental “rooms.” So beautiful!

2. Hancock-Clarke House

36 Hancock St, Lexington, MA 02420-3432 +1 781-861-0928
Excellent
72%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 189 reviews

Hancock-Clarke House

Hancock-Clarke House is closed for the season. It will re-open for tours in April 2018. The home of Lexington's first two ministers and the location where John Hancock and Sam Adams were staying on April 18, 1775. Paul Revere stopped here on his famous "Midnight Ride" to warn Hancock and Adams that British troops had left Boston.

Reviewed By signemspencer - Lexington, Massachusetts

I went years ago and then again recently. IT is MUCH better now, both exteriir and interior re done to reflect the time of the Revolution. THe docent was super and had LOTS of interesting tidbits to share... really made the history come alive.

3. Fenway Park

4 Yawkey Way, Boston, MA 02215-3409 +1 617-267-1700
Excellent
77%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 13 reviews

Fenway Park

Hallowed ground to baseball purists, this cozy, quirky park has been the Boston Red Sox home field since 1912. The most distinctive feature of this classic baseball park is the 37-foot-tall left field wall, known as the "Green Monster."

Reviewed By burnboy - Sunrise, Florida

Fenway is one of the greatest places to see baseball how it is meant to be. Hot (or Cold) but close to the players and with an atmosphere unlike any modern stadium. Food isn't that great but that isn't why you come here.

4. DeCordova Sculpture Park & Museum

51 Sandy Pond Rd, Lincoln, MA 01773-2600 +1 781-259-8355
Excellent
59%
Good
29%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 217 reviews

DeCordova Sculpture Park & Museum

The largest of its kind in New England, this sculpture park encompasses 35 acres, 20 miles northwest of Boston. The park features a constantly changing landscape of large-scale, outdoor, modern and contemporary sculpture and site-specific installations, and hosts more than 60 works, the majority of which are on loan. Year round activities include snowshoe tours, yoga in the park, birding tours, curator and artist conversations, and many special talks, screenings, and events.

Reviewed By pochejlee - Chicago, Illinois

Spent the afternoon exploring the grounds. It was serene and stimulating at the same time. The size of the artwork varies from huge, towering works to small, intimate pieces. As well as size variation, the diversity of subject matter and medium was also great. It was fun to see a piece from a distance and then to come up right to it--sometimes to be right within it. A quiet, surreal feeling throughout.

5. Armenian Library and Museum of America (ALMA)

65 Main St, Watertown Square, Watertown, MA 02472-4400 +1 617-926-2562
Excellent
84%
Good
12%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 25 reviews

Armenian Library and Museum of America (ALMA)

Reviewed By Carolyn4evr - Belmont, Massachusetts

So much history beautifully displayed and preserved - so much to read - so much to learn. The vast collection has over 20,000 artifacts, comprised of coins, textiles, rugs, books, etc... There are ongoing exhibits, diverse educational programs offered, concerts and you can schedule private tours and events. The gift shop is lovely too. Check the website for hours. Minimal fees: adult $7, students/seniors are $3, children under 12 are free. Metered parking is behind the building in a large public lot.

I am also happy that they have accepted many of my families treasured items to preserve and display in their collection. We never want to forget!

6. Cat Rock Park

Drabbington Way, Weston, MA
Excellent
78%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 22 reviews

Cat Rock Park

Reviewed By LAR1942 - Weston, Massachusetts

What a treasure for Georgy Girl. She romps and runs with all kinds of canines. Whether in the field or in the woods or in the water, she goes twice a day..sometimes with her walker, the loving Melissa, or with the 'rents. We often walk her around the reservoir, but on cold and icy days, the kind we have had over the recent past, Cat Rock rocks

7. Coolidge Corner Theater

290 Harvard St, Brookline, MA 02446-2917 +1 617-734-2501
Excellent
76%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 188 reviews

Coolidge Corner Theater

Reviewed By TravelinFamilyBoston - Boston

Just love this theater!

Comfortable seats, reasonable ticket prices, buy in advance option. Small place, with 3 screens of very different sizes (phone to see where your movie is showing if you care). Cute old-timey ads and announcements. Beer and wine in the lobby.

Eclectic movie selection.

8. Prospect Hill Park

322 Totten Pond Rd, Waltham, MA 02451-2047
Excellent
49%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 46 reviews

Prospect Hill Park

Reviewed By John B - Waltham, Massachusetts

This mostly undeveloped park consists mainly of hiking trails and walking paths. There is a road that winds through it that is closed in winter, and people sometimes have parties and picnics here, but the best parts of the park are untouched wilderness where you can find local flora and fauna in abundance. We've seen pileated woodpeckers, a barred owl, snakes, and many different kinds of native wildflowers. The view from Boston Rock is spectacular. The only place to park is off Totten Pond Road. There is a building there and a small playground for little kids. Years ago, there was skiing here!

9. Newton Cemetery

791 Walnut St, Newton, MA 02459-1719 +1 617-332-0047
Excellent
69%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 28 reviews

Newton Cemetery

An active cemetery for more than 160 years and an accredited arboretum, Newton Cemetery is a private, non-profit organization serving the needs of all faiths for Newton and the Boston area. Founded in 1855 during the garden cemetery movement, the picturesque grounds are open daily and the public is welcome to explore.

Reviewed By juliecrosson - Newton, Massachusetts

I've lived across from the cemetery for 8 yrs. It took the tree tour to get me to go in.
The trees are majestic and take the stroller to another place in time. The gravestones varied in artistic choices, centuries, names and cultures stimulate the imagination. A pair of ducks lolled around the pond. I didn't know such a lovely place was there all along, 50 yards across the street. The tree tour was given by a well-informed arborist and it was fun to learn the names of trees, their distinguishing features, and discover this lovely place along with others.

10. Harvard Art Museums

32 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138-3804 +1 617-495-9400
Excellent
69%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 363 reviews

Harvard Art Museums

The Harvard Art Museums house one of the largest and most renowned art collections in the United States, and are comprised of three museums (the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler Museums) and four research centers (the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art, the Harvard Art Museums Archives, and the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis). The Fogg Museum includes Western art from the Middle Ages to the present; the Busch-Reisinger Museum, unique among North American museums, is dedicated to the study of all modes and periods of art from central and northern Europe, with an emphasis on German-speaking countries; and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum is focused on Asian art, Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern art, and Islamic and later Indian art. Together, the collections include approximately 250,000 objects in all media. The Harvard Art Museums are distinguished by the range and depth of their collections, their groundbreaking exhibitions, and the original research of their staff. Integral to Harvard University and the wider community, the museums and research centers serve as resources for students, scholars, and the public. For more than a century they have been the nation’s premier training ground for museum professionals and are renowned for their seminal role in developing the discipline of art history in the United States. The Harvard Art Museums have a rich tradition of considering the history of objects as an integral part of the teaching and study of art history, focusing on conservation and preservation concerns as well as technical studies. The Harvard Art Museums’ 2014 renovation and expansion carried on the legacies of the three museums and united their remarkable collections under one roof for the first time. Renzo Piano Building Workshop preserved the Fogg Museum’s landmark 1927 facility, while transforming the space to accommodate 21st-century needs. The museums now feature 40 percent more gallery space, an expanded Art Study Center, conservation labs, and classrooms, and a striking glass roof that bridges the facility’s historic and contemporary architecture. The three constituent museums retain their distinct identities in the facility, yet their close proximity provides exciting opportunities to experience works of art in a broader context.

Reviewed By Angelo S - Hilliard, Ohio

I was very surprised to see such an extensive collection of ancient pottery within this art museum. The museum itself is very large, with significant amounts of space to move around and some really great works (self portrait of Van Gough, full portrait of Washington, works by Picasso and Monet). For me the pottery was the most interesting and I spend a significant amount of time in that area and the space dedicated to Mediterranean and Near Eastern Art.

ThingsTodoPost © 2018 All rights reserved.