Top 10 Things to do in Tokorozawa, Japan

October 16, 2017 Kandra Bartel

Tokorozawa is a city located in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 February 2016, the city had an estimated population of 335,968, and a population density of 4660 persons per km². Its total area is 72.11 square kilometres.
Restaurants in Tokorozawa

1. Tokorozawa Aviation Memorial Park

1-13 Namiki, Tokorozawa 359-0042, Saitama Prefecture +81 4-2998-4388
Excellent
35%
Good
52%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 157 reviews

Tokorozawa Aviation Memorial Park

Reviewed By Michael B - Suffolk, United Kingdom

Overall, this is a nice place to go for the day near Yokota and Fussa. They have many airplanes and helicopters to view with a few that you can sit in or walk around. They also have a few things for kids to do like the gravity walker, flight simulator, Mission control and art room. They also have an IMAX movie theater that plays an aviation movie, but unfortunately is all in Japanese.
Outside of the museum, there is a big open park area which is nice to bring your lunch or snacks while visiting.
Strollers are allowed in the museum and they have elevators too. In addition there is a small gift shop and restaurant that offers a buffet lunch and other snacks and drinks.
Keep in mind that parking is limited around the area. If you get there early and during the weekdays, should not be a problem.
The price for the museum was about 1,000 yen per adult with small children free.
The staff was helpful, despite the limited English (or our limited Japanese). Overall, it is nice to visit when wanting to stay near Yokota, approximately 30 mins drive near Seibu Dome.

2. Sayama Park

3-17-19 Tamako-cho, Higashimurayama 189-0026, Tokyo Prefecture +81 42-393-0154
Excellent
34%
Good
63%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 26 reviews

Sayama Park

Reviewed By Shinichi H - Uwajima, Japan

The view of the lake is amazing! The sunset is magical and I jogged here everyday. Sakura on spring time is wonderful. I jogged from my house to this park and spend the whole afternoon just chillin or jogging. There are some photographers by the bridge waiting to capture the perfect sunset. There's an amusement park at the front. The trees are lovely on summer, I usually pay respect every time I pass by.

3. Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

3-7-1 Sakuracho, Koganei 184-0005, Tokyo Prefecture +81 42-388-3300
Excellent
57%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 251 reviews

Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum

Dedicated to the architecture of the late Edo period, this outdoor museum showcases historic buildings, including 200-year-old farmhouses and specialty shops filled with reproduction products, such as a soy sauce shop, Japanese umbrella shop, and stationary store.

Reviewed By Zaropans - Brussels, Belgium

Delightful for any visitor and highly recommended for those interested in architecture or everyday life. The Mitsui villa and the rebuilt shopping street are utter highlights, and so is the replica of the onsen bathing house. The Mitsui villa is both zen and fancy and has an exquisite garden.
Koganei park (free entry) is pretty cool too, and has a steam train locomotive on display.
Beware: Google Maps may make you get off the train at the Higashi-Koganei station but the Musashi-Koganei station (oen stop further) has better bus connections !

4. Seibu Prince Dome

2135 Kamiyamaguchi, Tokorozawa 359-1153, Saitama Prefecture +81 4-2925-1141
Excellent
25%
Good
46%
Satisfactory
26%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 184 reviews

Seibu Prince Dome

Reviewed By Debbie K - Adrian, Michigan

The Seibu Dome is a great place to watch baseball. I went here with my Japanese colleague to take in a game between the Seibu Lions and the Tokyo Giants in interleague play (Pacific vs. Central League). This stadium is unique in that it is domed but there are no walls in most sections of the stadium. And where there might have been partial walls, they did not meet the roof. As such, it is still partially open air. This offers the pleasant feature of allowing enjoyment of the game in the fresh air without it being affected by the elements. The stadium concession stands were a little primitive by US stadium standards but they were still extensive. There were several food choices including noodles, sushi and other Asian fare as well as Western stadium food such as KFC. Japanese baseball is a unique experience as the fans from the two teams sit, for the most part, on opposite sides of the stadium. In this case, there were a large contingent of Giants fans since Tokyo was an easy train ride from Saitama. When each team is at bat, their fans are led in organized chants and cheers to support their teams. For the home team, this included a drum (a la the movie "Major League") and a horn. There were also notable differences in some details such as the fact that the Manager can remain on the field as a new pitcher is warming up, players can play catch in front of the dugouts during the game and other such nuances. But the key thing is that the quality of play has always been very good from what I observed. The play tends to go on for a while (almost 4 hours in this case) as Japanese hitters are more patient and pitchers tend to nibble the corners instead of challenge the hitters. This makes for deep pitch counts and longer playing time. This was the eighth Japanese Major League, or Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), stadium to which I have been and this was probably one of the most enjoyable games I have witnessed. It helped that there was an exciting finish with a two-out, 3-run single (yes, single) in the ninth inning by the Tokyo batter (I think it was Abe) who had two strikes on him at the time. It was a hit that fell between the 2Bman, CF and RF and was off the glove of the 2Bman who unfortunately fell injured and had to be carried off the field by stretcher. That hit erased a 3-1 Seibu lead. Overall, it was a fun game to watch. If you are visiting Japan, a visit to an NPB game can be a very enjoyable experience. Even if you are not a baseball fan, it is an interesting window into Japanese culture. While Sumo might be the uniquely Japanese sport, Baseball is still the National game and the populace follows their teams passionately. The manifestation of this passion is intriguing to witness.

5. Higashimurayama Shobu Matsuri

4-50 Noguchicho | Kitayama Park, Higashimurayama, Tokyo Prefecture
Excellent
33%
Good
56%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 18 reviews

Higashimurayama Shobu Matsuri

Nature-rich Kitayama Park with the Sayama Hills in the background is one of the "New 100 Scenic Views of Tokyo." The Higashimurayama Shobu Matsuri is held in early summer when 220 species of 100,000 irises bloom. The entertainment includes an outdoor tea ceremony, festival music, and koto Performances. Festival stalls sell the city's famous produce and goods. Potted and cut irises are also sold. Food and drinks are also available.

Reviewed By 白熊爺 - 東京

6月10日に訪問
この日は東村山駅から北山公園までシャトルタクシーが出ていて150円で行けました。
3台のワンボックスのタクシーが出ていたので待つ事無く乗る事が出来ました。
夕方の4時半まで営業すると言っていました。
会場では日中は地元の太鼓や踊り等が披露され特に子供さんの踊りはとてもユーモラスで良かったです。
しかもとても上手です。
模擬店では東村山名物の黒やきそばがありピリットしながらもコクがあって美味しかった。
夜の7時からはライトアップされ雰囲気も上々でした。
沖縄歌謡のライブもしていて雰囲気にピッタリ。
それ以上に良かったのが夜になると一斉に鳴き出すカエルの声や虫を求めて飛んで来るコウモリ、草露の匂いを濃厚に含んだ山風など日頃忘れていた自然の中の夜の部分を感じられた所。
自分の中の野生がちょっと騒ぎだした感じでした。

6. Tokorozawa Aviation Museum

1-13 Namiki, Tokorozawa 359-0042, Saitama Prefecture +81 4-2996-2225
Excellent
23%
Good
60%
Satisfactory
17%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 46 reviews

Tokorozawa Aviation Museum

Reviewed By PhilG8 - Royal Tunbridge Wells, United Kingdom

If you are interested in aviation and visiting Tokyo then you simply must visit this museum! A great collection of aircraft are on display and historically this is a place of great significance to Japanese aviation as their first powered flight took place here in 1911 and the runway area has been preserved.
It is fairly easy to get too from Tokyo, from a central station pick up the Seibu Shinjuku Line and travel directly to Koku-Koen Station. But a little bit of advice, the line operates three different coloured trains which travel the route at different speeds – one stops at every station, one at a about half the amount and another a very fast train with only a few stops! The difference in journey is significant so make sure you check which train you are on! On the slow train out it took about an hour but on the fast train back I was in Tokyo within about 25 minutes!
Upon arrival at Koku-Koen it is becomes very obvious you are in the right place! There is a retired All Nippon Aiways NAMC YS-11 turboprop aircraft on display right outside the station! There are also useful signs with aircraft pictures on which direct you the right way. It’s about a 10 minute walk along the main road, over a bridge and through a wooded park area before you spot the building and the C46 Commando out the front of the museum.
First of all the museum – it is a very well presented museum and the facilities are really modern. The aircraft are easily accessible and well-spaced out for photography, the catwalk and higher levels offer an interesting view of the aircraft on the display floor and of those hung up. The T6 and the Sikorsky and Vertol helicopters were the highlights for me, you can also go aboard the Vertol. Most the aircraft are the Japanese license built variants of US designs that the JSDF used in post war period, it is always interesting to see the Japanese markings and paint schemes on these. There are other “hands on” exhibits and light aircraft to sit in too which are very interesting to children but I found as it was in Japan the conduct of children and parents with hands on exhibits was much better than that of UK museums – no screaming kids! Away from the main hall are exhibits focussing on the very early days of aviation at the site and celebrating its historical significance. A Nieuport taking pride of place in this area which also includes some impressive models and dioramas. There is also a very well stocked shop and a large entrance area with a I assume a replica of the first aircraft as flown from here, the Kaishkiki 1, suspended above.
The displays are mostly in Japanese with not much English and I found the main focus in the exhibition spaces being on the early days of aviation and then the main display floor on the post WW2 period. Very little information being given on WW2 era aviation with the exception of some American airshow clips and the types of US Navy aircraft which fought in the pacific. However, although not there during the time of my visit I am aware that a US based A6M Zero fighter aircraft was loaned out to the museum for a year filling in this gap as a temporary exhibit.
Outside the C46 dominates the area in front of the impressive museum structure. Considering it remains outside it is in great condition and looks awesome in its JSDF markings. A high wire fence is all around it which unfortunately limits the view slightly for photography. The park area is lovely, the Gardens are so well maintained and a great many people seem to come here just to relax. The runway area from the first flight is nicely preserved with a monument and there are also shaded areas and plenty of benches.
Overall I highly recommend this museum to people both with and without an interest in aviation. If you have an interest in historic aviation then there is plenty to see and you really can feel that you are in a significant location. If you don’t have an a massive interest it is still interesting to visit and see the aircraft and enjoy the lovely location out of the busy and hectic urban areas of Tokyo.

7. Kitayama Park

4-50 Noguchicho, Higashimurayama 189-0022, Tokyo Prefecture
Excellent
25%
Good
57%
Satisfactory
18%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 16 reviews

Kitayama Park

Reviewed By Shinichi H - Uwajima, Japan

The summer festival is awesome!!! I love the pond and the flowers at this park. It is also a walking distance from Higashimurayama station but you can take the bus too. It is quiet. The trees are great too! I cant wait to visit it again on autumn.

8. Seibuen Amusement Park

2964 Yamaguchi, Tokorozawa 359-1145, Saitama Prefecture +81 4-2922-1371
Excellent
19%
Good
41%
Satisfactory
29%
Poor
4%
Terrible
7%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 126 reviews

Seibuen Amusement Park

Reviewed By nyay - New York City, New York

Relatively small amusement park but good for very young kids to spend a day. Even it was on Saturday, not crowded at all!
Mainly peaceful kids rides like choo choo train, hello kitty coffee cup etc. only a few scary rides. No waiting line.
Jairo tower was one of their featured rides, a tall tower to view Tokorozawa city and Lake Dayana from the sky, which was beautiful.
The place wasn't 100% well designed for strollers. Some restaurants asked to park strollers at the ground floor and no elevator access but stairways.
The time we visited was even in late September, but we were swooped by mosquitos as their unwelcome souvenirs.

9. Tokorozawa Shinmeisha

1-2-4 Miyamotocho, Tokorozawa 359-1143, Saitama Prefecture +81 4-2922-3919
Excellent
22%
Good
61%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
4%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 22 reviews

Tokorozawa Shinmeisha

Reviewed By HNDNRT - Tokyo Prefecture, Japan

以前にもお参りに来たことがありますが、清々しく雰囲気の良い神社です。
所沢が航空発祥の地である事は知る人ぞ知る、なのかもしれません。
私は太平洋戦争などの歴史に強い関心がある事、自分も家族も旅客機に関わる仕事に就いていた事で子供の頃から航空機に興味があり知っていました。
車で5分くらい走ると航空記念公園や管制塔があり、航空記念公園駅にはYS-11もあったり、所沢と飛行機が強く関連しているのがわかります。
境内の鳥船神社で旅の安全を祈願致しました。
七五三の時期なので賑やかでした。

10. Shofukuji Temple

4-6-1 Noguchicho, Higashimurayama 189-0022, Tokyo Prefecture +81 42-391-0460
Excellent
19%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
48%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 21 reviews

Shofukuji Temple

Reviewed By swordfish24 - Brisbane, Australia

The Jizo Hall at Shofukuji Temple in Higashimurayama in the western suburbs of Tokyo is well worth a visit. It is architecturally the cutest building with its roof line and also has a wonderful tradition that goes with it.
It is the oldest Zen temple in eastern Japan first built in 1278 with a major rebuild in 1407. The structure is innovative with strength and elasticity.
We found a rack of shelves of small jizo statues to the left of the hall. These are for people who are sick. They can take one home for themselves or a sick family member and when they recover the jizo is returned and a new jizo is bought to accompany it.
For such an important temple we were surprised to find almost no one visiting. The only other visitor there was a man from Osaka who had come to see it and was curious as to how we, a couple of gaijins, knew about it.
My wife had singled it out to see from a book on Japanese Architecture.
There is an unofficial information place at the sweet shop just nearby where they sell newly carved wooden jizos. The carvings have their hands together in prayer and a red ribbon around the neck. That’s a pretty good souvenir by which to remember the Jizo Hall.

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