Top 10 Things to do in Stilwell, United States

January 8, 2018 Stefan Strunk

Stilwell in United States, from Nouth America region, is best know for History Museums. Discover best things to do in Stilwell with beautiful photos and great reviews from traveller around the world here!
Restaurants in Stilwell

1. Cherokee Heritage Center

21192 S. Keeler Drive, Park Hill, OK 74451 +1 918-456-6007
Excellent
70%
Good
23%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 146 reviews

Cherokee Heritage Center

An independent nonprofit organization with a mission to preserve, promote, and teach Cherokee history, heritage, and culture. The center sits on 44 beautiful acres in historic Park Hill, Oklahoma and is home to the Diligwa Cherokee Village, an outdoor living history attraction, a genealogy library, and the Cherokee National Museum and Archives plus a permanent exhibit on the Trail of Tears and 1500 square feet of exhibit space with changing exhibits.

Reviewed By charles s - London, United Kingdom

The Cherokee Heritage Center includes indoor museum exhibitions, an art gallery and large gift shop. Outdoor there are authentic reproductions of traditional dwellings with rural villagers demonstrating traditional Cherokee crafts. Our guide Jeff, with his true Cherokee lineage, provided an educational, interesting and often amusing tour of the external village site to learn about the Cherokee people and their daily way of life. This included their homes, their foods and cooking methods, tools, the making of bows, arrows, using blowpipes, and playing of games. There is a small admission fee and the center is open seven days a week with car parking in the onsite grounds.

2. Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park

14262 W Highway 62, Prairie Grove, AR 72753 +1 501-846-2990
Excellent
70%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 67 reviews

Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park

Reviewed By John E - Ballwin, Missouri

This park is located along Hy. 62 in Prairie Grove and is on the Farmington/Fayetteville side of town. This is a pleasant park with nice scenery and walking trails and offers history lessons on a Civil War battle that occurred, apparently, on the site of the park. Nice pleasant park worth a stop if you have the time.

3. Lincoln Lake City Park

West Avenue, Lincoln, AR 72744
Excellent
50%
Good
50%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 4 reviews

Lincoln Lake City Park

Reviewed By Kevin G - Jackson, Missouri

Enjoyed the 4 & 1/2 mile hike around Lincoln Lake, even though it was unseasonably warm for September! Would have a better view of the lake after the leaves fall off the trees!

4. Devil's Den State Park

11333 W Highway 74, West Fork, AR 72774-9666 +1 479-761-3325
Excellent
69%
Good
23%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 281 reviews

Devil's Den State Park

Reviewed By Lo S - Arlington, Texas

We've been camping all over Texas; this was our first trip to Arkansas. From the get go, I appreciated being able to reserve specific spots (which isn't available yet in Texas). The website was easy to navigate and using Google maps (street view), we were able to get a really good idea of what our sites were going to look and be like, prior to booking. We camped with our 3 children, our friends, and their two children over the week of spring break. We chose campsite A spots 21 and 23, which were right next to one another, and relatively close to the bathhouse and a short walk across the road to the river. These are great spots for big families or friends camping together, not so great if you're right next to people you don't know (there're nothing to "separate" the two sites, so not much privacy.) There were no rvs at all in this area, which when you're tent camping makes for a quieter experience. The water spigots were a short distance away, no trouble. The bath house itself was clean, however we did notice toilet paper was sparce by the end of our stay. Also, in the women's room, there was no soap (for handwashing) and the hand drier wasn't working. I appreciated that the park offers recycling bins, because we all use bottled water, however the openings to insert the water were the size of a single bottle. Most campers use the gallon jugs and/or the bigger ones you set out on the table. It would be nice if bigger plastic items could be conveniently recycled. Back to the campsite. Section A is located in a valley. Our sites backed up onto the Yellow Rock Trail which makes it convenient for hiking and exploring. The kids enjoyed the freedom to go off and explore a little on their own, with walkie talkies so we could keep track of them. With the river being so close, the kids could also easily explore that area as well. We hiked Fossil Flats the second day, which offers 3 different hike lengths. (We did the 3 mile loop). This trail doubles as a mountain biking trail, which looked like a lot of fun (although we didn't bring any bikes). This Fossil Flats Trail has a lot of rough rocks, ups, and downs, and crosses the river in two different places. If you look carefully, you can spot some fossils down by the riverbed (shells, coral, etc). I'd recommend multi-purpose hike/water shoes for this one, or just be prepared to take off your shoes and socks. The river rocks themselves are quite slippery. Two of the kids fell in at two different points in our treks across. The week of spring break was lively with park sponsored activities too. We did the snake skin bookmark making class, which was fun for the kids and very educational. We also did the ranger-guided hike to the overlook on the Yellow Rock trail, which was also really cool and informative. I highly recommend the overlook, as the view is incredible. There is quite an ascent however, so I wouldn't recommend it for people who get altitude sickness or would have difficulty climbing. We hiked Devil's Den and must admit this trail was the worst as far as poor markings. We somehow ended up on the "old" trail and hiked all the way to the top of the hillside/mountain. Out of frustration, we made it to the road and wound all the way back down traversing the switch backs, which simply added mileage to our trip. My advice for Devil's Den Trail, stay to the left! We also did the Lakeside Trail which took us past the dam. That was pretty cool and the easiest hike at the park, perfect for every fitness level. There is also a bridge which goes across the river for access to the playground. We didn't go to the playground, but it looked like a fun, relatively modern playscape. The restaurant/pool wasn't open this time of year, but it looked like it would be a fun place to hang out! Some of the wildlife we saw/heard included bats (one flew over our tent right at dusk), barred owls, geese, squirrels, hawks, and Turkey vultures. It was pretty cold the week we went, with overnight lows in the 20s. What saved us was "Hot Hands" which our friend had brought. They go in your pockets (we also stuffed them in our socks) and were able to get through the nights just fine. For those of you who have ventured to the end of this review, I'm going to give you an extra special surprise/tip. We discovered this trail through word of mouth, from a nice camper we met across the way (she said she found it on Pintrest!) There is an unmarked trail across the street from the park entrance sign. There is a gravel cutout there. Park and hike (same side) to an opening a few yards into the park. Follow the creek bed/trail down to a bluff. Just under the bluff is an old moonshiner's cavern/hideout. It has window and doorway cutouts and everything! There are a few small waterfalls as well, and it's absolutely beautiful down there. This was the only trail we were on alone (on spring break). This was the last thing we did before leaving, and I'm so happy and grateful we did, because it's a treasure for sure!

5. Sequoyah's Cabin

470288 Highway 101, Sallisaw, OK 74955-7306 +1 918-775-2413
Excellent
73%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 35 reviews

Sequoyah's Cabin

Reviewed By KBD87 - Arkansas

We stopped by Sequoyah's Cabin park and we're very impressed. It is on Sequoyah's former farm and the WPA built a building around the cabin in the 1930s and a rock wall around the farm as well as other improvements. There are paved walkways and beautiful informative features around the acreage. The cabin itself is a wonderful piece of history along with its many artifacts and exhibits. There was no one else around when we visited so it was perfectly peaceful and we went at our own pace. If you're visiting the Cherokee Nation this is a key stop, if you're just rolling down I40 and want to take in some history and have a break, this is a great stop.

6. Cherokee National Prison Museum

124 E Choctaw St, Tahlequah, OK 74464-3918 +1 918-207-3640
Excellent
58%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 19 reviews

Cherokee National Prison Museum

The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in the entire Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced or accused prisoners from throughout the territory. It was built in 1875 and was created for the purpose of reformation as well as for punishment for offenders. The principal chief had the power to pardon condemned men, with the advice and consent of his executive council, but this was rarely exercised. Built of sandstone rock, it was, "made to hold the most hardened and dangerous prisoners."

Reviewed By MTravi - Nashville, Tennessee

Located in a former jail this museum details the law enforcement history of the area and specifically with the Cherokee nation. Lots of information about colorful characters and current information about Cherokee law enforcement given on interactive consoles. A reconstructed gallows is outside in the back, although it is roped off so you do not climb it. Next door around back are actual cells used and more stories of inmates housed there. Small gift shop available and bathrooms. Parking area is small. open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-4pm. Admission $5 or get the Compass pass. Allow about an hour to visit.

7. Riverbend Floats

15693 Ok-10, Tahlequah, OK 74464 +1 918-708-6800
Excellent
100%
Good
0%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 12 reviews

Riverbend Floats

River outfitter and lodging in Oklahoma's scenic Illinois River corridor. We are located smack in the middle of the best floating and recreation area in the Oklahoma Ozarks. Come enjoy our laid back family destination!

Reviewed By Lori M - Topeka, Kansas

First time in Tahlequah . First time floating the Illinois River. Great, wonderful, friendly service!! Robbie stayed late for us to check in our first night, offered me coffee in the morning and had great recommendations once leaving and traveling on into OKC, via Route...MoreI was wondering how your trip down Rt 66 went and it appears it was good. Thanks for visiting Riverbend Floats and please come back!

8. George M. Murrell Home

19479 E Murrel Home Rd, Park Hill, OK 74451-2001 +1 918-456-2751
Excellent
56%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 18 reviews

George M. Murrell Home

Reviewed By charles s - London, United Kingdom

This historic house was built in 1845 by wealthy white planter and merchant George Murrell and his wife, interestingly, the niece of the Cherokee leader. During the American Civil War, it was the only building to survive in the local area. The house is perfectly preserved and beautifully furnished from the mid 1800’s period including artifacts from the Murrell family. It is operated as a museum by the Oklahoma Historical Society and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1974. Within the surrounding grounds there is a log cabin used for living history demonstrations of Cherokee life during the mid-19th century. In the park is the Tehlequah Historic Trail. Entry for a self-guide tour is by free entry with suggested donations, friendly knowledgeable staff are on hand for any visitor questions.

9. Daisies and Olives

129 E Buchanan St # 135, Prairie Grove, AR 72753-2900 +1 479-846-1800
Excellent
92%
Good
8%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 12 reviews

Daisies and Olives

Reviewed By Cjordan128b

So much to see and wanted to have a uhaul to carry everything back that wanted! Will be back for sure! Women here are amazing too!

10. John Ross Museum

22366 S 530 Rd, Park Hill, OK 74451 +1 918-431-0757
Excellent
45%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
33%
Poor
11%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

John Ross Museum

The John Ross Museum highlights the life of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years, and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation's passion for the education of its people. The museum also has a gift shop and research area. The museum is located adjacent to Ross Cemetery in former Rural School #51 near Park Hill, Okla. The museum was originally built in 1913 to operate as a rural school in Cherokee County just after Oklahoma statehood. The school served Cherokee and non-Cherokee students and the facility remained open through the 1950s.

Reviewed By Will E

This museum is a hidden gem off the beaten path between the Cherokee Heritage Museum and Murrell Home. Situated next to the Ross Cemetery (the final resting place of Chief John Ross and several other prominent Cherokee and survivors of the Trail of Tears). Justin was great and shared a lot about the culture of the Cherokee and especially explaining the importance of the stomp dances and how the Cherokee religion easily meshes with that of Christianity. He also explained how the Cherokee Nation is not a reservation (as is a common misconception). If you really want a lesson on the Cherokee people post removal, please do not miss this museum. I hope anyone who visits this museum has a chance to go while Justin is there. Be sure to purchase your Cherokee Compass. It comes with a free shirt and access to this museum as well as the Heritage Center, Supreme Court Museum, and the Cherokee Prison Museum. It saves you almost 50% off admissions to these museums and gives you a great souvenir as well pointing out over 100+ free things to do while you're in the Cherokee Nation.

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