Top 10 Things to do in Province of Girona, Spain

January 24, 2018 Franklyn Hardiman

Girona (Catalan pronunciation: [ʒiˈɾonə], Spanish: Gerona [xeˈɾona]) is a province of Spain, in the northeastern part of the autonomous community of Catalonia. It is bordered on the northwest by the province of Lleida, on the southwest by the province of Barcelona, on the north by France, and on the east by the Mediterranean Sea.
Restaurants in Province of Girona

1. Fundacio Mona, Primate Sanctuary

Carretera C-25, s/n, 17457 Riudellots de la Selva, Spain +34 972 47 76 18
Excellent
86%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 179 reviews

Fundacio Mona, Primate Sanctuary

Fundació MONA was created to put an end to illegal trade, exploitation and abuse of primates in captivity, to report their real risk of extintion and to support their protection in the wild. Close to Girona, MONA has established one of the few animal sanctuaries in Europe that offers a home-for-life for chimps and other rescued primates, where they are able to live in natural surroundings. MONA is a place in which people become inspired, wish to further understand them, and develop a greater respect for them.

Reviewed By Parsaregreat - Dunfermline

Excellent tour in English. Very informative tour of the facilities plus a great chance to get photos of the monkeys. On the tour they tell about the history of the animals that you see and tour finishes with a short film of how the sanctuary...MoreThank you very much for coming. It was nice to have you here and share our work with you. Thank you for your contribution and see you soon.

2. Vila Vella (Old Town)

Tossa de Mar, Spain +34 972 34 01 00
Excellent
77%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 1 reviews

Vila Vella (Old Town)

This National Monument is the only surviving walled city on the Catalan coast.

Reviewed By TAIN2013 - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Surrounded by the city walls, the old town leads down from the Castle and takes you back in time with its narrow, winding cobbled streets and stone houses. The walls are interspersed with towers and gates and are very well preserved. The streets offer great views great views over the city and the beach from several points.
Built on a hillside, the town requires a lot of climbing. So wear appropriate footwear.

3. Camino de Ronda

Spain
Excellent
87%
Good
12%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 402 reviews

Camino de Ronda

Reviewed By Vista888 - Vancouver, Canada

The perfect blend of natural beauty, adventure, history, wonderful accommodation, delicious local cuisine, and friendly people. The Cami de Ronda is a 230 km trail stretching along the picturesque Costa Brava coastline from Lloret de Mar (north of Barcelona) to the French boarder. There are many access points and a wide variety of terrain, including flat seawalks in resort towns, steep rocky trails through pine Forests, scenic staircases hugging the coastline, and sandy beach walking. Depending on the section you choose and the time available, it could be an afternoon stroll or multi-day hiking trip. The trail is very well maintained and well-marked. (Keep an eye out for the red and white parallel lines which indicate you are going in the correct direction, if the red and white lines are crossed you have taken a wrong turn.) We chose to hike the most scenic and popular section, called the ‘Baix Emporda’, equipped with a 30 liter backpack, sturdy walking shoes, a flexible schedule and no Reservations. We visited in Sept 2016, shoulder season, and easily found great accommodation at reasonable prices. We spent 7 days on the trail, only travelling by foot. Most of the hiking is quite easy for someone with reasonable fitness. The most difficult part was from Platja Fonda to Begur as it is all uphill.
Getting there? We took the SARFA / Moventis bus from Barcelona to Sant Feliu de Guixols, and spend the first night at the charming Can Segura Hotel… with time to explore the town, marina, and the monastery. We set out early the next day, and picked up the trail at the far north part of town, behind the marina….keep an eye open for the red and white lines painted on the roadway and poles. (Note: Sant Feliu de Guixols is also kilometer zero for the Via Verde, rails-to-trails path which heads inland and connects Catalonia to the Camino de Santiago)
Along the Cami de Ronda, you’ll discover historical sites, picturesque fishing villages, resort towns, secluded coves, pine Forests, naturist Beaches, and friendly people - the common Catalan greeting is ‘hola bon dia’. We enjoyed daily swims in the ocean, and marveled at the trail construction. It originated as a route to patrol the coast from pirates, and to connect fishing villages… later it became an escape route to France during the Spanish Civil War. We ended our hiking trip in Begur and took a bus to Palafrugell, then on to Girona. Along the Cami de Ronda we discovered so many beautiful, interesting spots … it would be a long list to name them all… enjoy the trail – it’s a wonderful adventure.

4. Cap de Creus National Park

Cadaques, Spain +34 666 38 28 52
Excellent
76%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Cap de Creus National Park

This National Park features unique rock formations and panoramic ocean views.

Reviewed By Marilyn C - Singapore, Singapore

Hiked the coastal trail from Cadaques to Cap de Creus lighthouse and back. About 15km in total. Took about 4 hours going and 2.5 hours on return. The reason we took a much longer time going was because we could not locate the start of the trail after Port Lligat. Followed the instructions provided in the brochure, we walked along the S'Alqueria residential area but the sign pointing to the trail was quite obscure and we missed it and ended up walking an unmarked trail only to turn back later. Once we got back on the trail, it was quite well marked all the way.
Although the hike is not technically challenging, it is not an easy one. The trail is mostly rocky and uphill so you have to be reasonably fit. The last stretch of the trail leading up to the lighthouse is also quite tricky as there are no clearly defined routes so you'll just have to figure out by instinct. Following is a brief summary of key routes:
1. Cadaques to Port Lligat (uphill climb along Carrer de Miranda)
2. Leave Port Lligat, walk along S'Alqueria (paved road)
3. Look out for the directional sign on the left of the last residential house (see photo)
4. Start of the trail to Guillola
5. Do not turn to Guillola unless you plan to detour for a dip
6. Continue on the paved road until you see the sign pointing to Cap de Creus
7. From here, continue hiking for about 1.5 hours on undulating rocky terrains
8. You're almost reaching the end of the hike when you see the lighthouse in sight and the Jugadora cove on your right. Reward yourself with a dip in the picturesque cove
9. Hike the final stretch to the lighthouse an enjoy the panoramic views

5. Bridge of Besalu

Sobre el rio Fluvia 17850, Besalu, Spain +34 972 59 12 40
Excellent
71%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Bridge of Besalu

Ancient bridge (11th century) with towers..

Reviewed By Tantiko - Singapore, Singapore

This is a lovely little medieval village where the highlight is the postcard worthy bridge across the river. If you have the time, it is possible to take pictures of the bridge from all four sides with a bit of walking. There are quite a few restaurants and cafes especially around the main square but you can also buy a take away lunch and walk down to the riverside where there is a bench or two and enjoy a lovely view of the bridge. The rest of the village can be covered easily on foot and the central church is worth a visit inside but there are plenty of photo opportunities around so allow yourself an hour or two to roam around.

6. Castillo de Tossa de Mar

Tossa de Mar, Spain +34 972 34 01 00
Excellent
70%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 2 reviews

Castillo de Tossa de Mar

Reviewed By TAIN2013 - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The castle is located on a hill overlooking the Platja Gran and offers commanding views over the town, beach and the sea. The actual defensive structures are now in ruins and only the remains of a few buildings, castle walls and towers are still intact. However, the old town is still inhabited. It takes a bit of climbing to get to the top and around halfway there is a beautiful statue of Ava Gardner.

7. Siurana

T3225, 43362 Siurana, Spain
Excellent
79%
Good
19%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 110 reviews

Siurana

Reviewed By VileraVillajoyosa - Villajoyosa

It's an hour drive from Falset (30 km) through the Mountains on narrow steap roads which are also breathtaking. When you park you car just outside the village it's a 5 minute walk at the most. The village is tiny and neat. The view at the Reservoir and over the Mountains is Unbelievable. Worth your while to drive the whole way up and back. We had a small lunch at the small square which was nice. Be careful if you got vertigo because there are NO railings.

8. Village Medieval de Pals

Pals Gerone Espagne, Pals, Spain +34 649 19 21 90
Excellent
67%
Good
29%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Village Medieval de Pals

Reviewed By gaiteiro - Auckland

The week after a bunch of public holidays in winter is probably a good time to visit somewhere like Pals. The maze of cobbled streets were almost deserted, and everything except the church was closed (and we only just managed to get in there before someone came to lock it). It feels very untouched by the modern world, and we easily spent two hours exploring all the little alleyways and staircases. Living in NZ, historical stuff is what we miss, and Pals gave it to us in spades.

9. La Fageda d'en Jorda

Parc Natural de la Zoina Vulcanica de Garotxa, Olot, Spain +34 972 26 81 12
Excellent
71%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 662 reviews

La Fageda d'en Jorda

Reviewed By Odelia27 - Tel Aviv, Israel

Nuce easy walk at the forest/ we took the short course which took us around 40 min. the signs coukd be better byr we mannaged.

10. Castle Besalu

17850, Besalu, Spain
Excellent
74%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 132 reviews

Castle Besalu

Reviewed By burr6013 - Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

Besalú is one of Catalonia’s best preserved medieval villages. Around the 9th century, Besalú was the capital of the County of Besalú which, at various times, extended as far north as Corbières in present-day France. Besalú has narrow, cobblestone streets and old stone buildings. Its fortified bridge, which dates back to the 11th century and spans the Fluvià river, is perhaps Besalu's most important monument. Placa Llibertat in Besalu's centre is a beautiful, medieval square surrounded by buildings. The tourist office is here - housed in the 13th century Casa de la Vila. Leave the square on Calle Tallaferro and admire the village’s stunning buildings including the ruins of Col·legiata de Santa Maria, a primitive chapel. Sant Vicenç church and Monastery Sant Pere (consecrated in 1003) are also both worth a visit. Both are Romanesque churches. Back near the bridge is a Jewish bathhouse, a mikvah, which dates back to 1264. It is one of only three surviving Mikvah's in Europe. Also worth a visit are the Cúria Real, a gothic room of the Royal Cúria, and Sant Julià de Besalú, an ancient hospital built for the poor in the 12th and 13th century by the Monastery. Besalú lost its independence in favour of the County of Barcelona in 1111. It was designated a site of historical and artistic importance in 1966.

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