Top 10 Things to do in Province of Avellino, Italy

October 28, 2017 Janette Largent

The Province of Avellino (Italian: Provincia di Avellino) is a province in the Campania region of Southern Italy. The area is characterized by numerous small towns and villages scattered across the province; only two towns have a population over 20,000: its capital city Avellino and Ariano Irpino.
Restaurants in Province of Avellino

1. Oasi Valle della Caccia

4,7 Km. da Senerchia | Contrada Acquabianca, 83050 Senerchia, Italy +39 331 966 3717
Excellent
85%
Good
13%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 305 reviews

Oasi Valle della Caccia

Reviewed By Giovanni G

Only €2 for adults and so worth it! A little path leads you to Bridges which you cross over the stream a few times in lovely surroundings and you eventually getting to the waterfall! Great for the whole family!!

2. Castello Lancellotti

Piazza Castello, 83023 Lauro AV, Italia, 83023 Lauro, Italy +39 327 457 4630
Excellent
71%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 173 reviews

Castello Lancellotti

Reviewed By Giuseppe D

È il simbolo di un paese, della collettività, forse il fulcro di un intero comprensorio. Una struttura davvero ben mantenuta e curata, insieme al centro storico in cui è ubicato. Un esempio di come dovrebbe essere gestito il nostro patrimonio culturale.

3. Abbazia del Goleto

Contrada San Guglielmo 83054 Sant'Angelo Dei Lombardi (AV), 83054 Sant'Angelo dei Lombardi, Italy +39 0827 24432
Excellent
66%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 155 reviews

Abbazia del Goleto

Reviewed By meriann - Italy

If you are around, you definitely need to stop by. Medieval abbey, well kept and really fascinating. Not much around, but a really pleasant place to see !!

4. Antico Castello Winery

Contrada Poppano 11/bis, 83050 San Mango sul Calore, Italy +39 328 107 6491
Excellent
99%
Good
1%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 59 reviews

Antico Castello Winery

Antico Castello is an agricultural corporation directly tied to the “Irpinia Territory” and jointly owned by the siblings Francesco, a young engineer and Chiara, an economist who together made the decision with courage and enthusiasm to keep the corporation a family venture and continue its traditions and culture.

Reviewed By JimandColetta

My wife and I really enjoyed our visit to Antico Castello Winery. This is a family run business that produces excellent wines of high quality. Our tour of the vineyard and facility was very informative and well presented by our English speaking guide. The wine tasting was paired with delicious food prepared by the family's mother. A truly enjoyable experience and we hope to return one day.

5. Santuario San Gerardo

Via del Santuario 27, 83040 Materdomini, Caposele, Italy +39 0827 58118
Excellent
70%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 215 reviews

Santuario San Gerardo

Reviewed By Amush - Congers, New York

On our recent trip to Italy, my husband and I made it a priority to visit the tombs of certain saints who are near to our hearts, and St. Gerard of Materdomini was one of them. We visited for religious reasons, but found little logistical information on line to help us plan our trip, so I offer this review to help future visitors.
GETTING THERE: Although in the remote mountain town of Materdomini, the Sanctuary is very easy to get to by car. The route is all highways from the A1 autostrada, and as you get closer, the signs pointing to the "Santuario San Gerardo" will get you there. Use the address of the facility given on the website in your GPS to get you there - it worked for us.
SITE AMENITIES: This place is clearly equipped for bus tourists. Although we had the place nearly to ourselves on a Tuesday afternoon in July, the size of the parking lot and other amenities leads me to believe that the place gets a large amount of (mostly Italian?) visitors via bus. There is a large, shady picnic area in the wooded area next to the parking lot where we enjoyed our home-packed sandwiches, and that seems to be encouraged. Toilet amenities are large, and the complex appears to be handicapped accessible. Also, we were here on a summer afternoon, and with the exception of the gift shop, the entire complex was open all afternoon (rare during the Italian afternoon siesta time).
THE COMPLEX: There are several buildings here which will take some time for a visitor to go through, maybe 2-3 hours.
1 - MODERN CHURCH: The first structure that you come to is a modern (1070's?) church dedicated to St. Gerard. It was here where we enjoyed mass at noon (all in Italian), and it seems there are other mass times posted outside (see photo). Other than the mass, and the obvious architectural reference to LeCorbusier's Ronchamp chapel in France from the interior, there is little else of interest here.
2 - ROOM OF THE BOWS: Past the entrance into the new church, you will come to the relatively small (15' x 25') Room of the Bows. It is here where Italian families come to drop a gift of pink or blue bows and other baby items to St. Gerard in thanks of their precious arrivals. The ceiling is covered in a sea of pink and blue baby items, and every inch of the rest of the room is covered with photos of babies. It happened to be a very emotional experience for me. There is a large, plexiglass box where you can leave items for inclusion in the room, and witnessed one family doing so during our visit.
3 - OLD CHURCH: Continue past the entrance into the new church, and you will come to the old church of St. Gerard. It is here where the tomb of St. Gerard exists. A very beautiful, somber and holy place. On the way, you will also see "Little Gerard's well," the site of one of the Saint's miracles. As the story goes, when he was a young boy, a key was dropped down into the well. Hearing of this dilemma, the young Gerard went to fetch a small statue of the baby Jesus, lowered it down into the well, and pulled up the baby Jesus holding the lost key.
4 - MUSEUM: Through the old church, and through a side door, you will make your way to the museum of St. Gerard. Here you will see many paintings depicting the life of the Saint and his miracles, as well as several personal items. Included here is the device that he used for his daily self-flagellation. In addition, you can see St. Gerard's bedroom set up. I have to imagine that this was brought here into the museum, and not the original location, but it gives a good visual indication of the spartan life that he led.
5 - ADDITIONAL MUSEUM: Back through the linking concrete structure, and upstairs, there is another museum filled with gifts to the Saint in thanks for his help in intercession in their lives. On the walls are countless photos of car crashes survived, and letters describing ailments cured. In addition, there are metal plates hung on the walls of different body parts (i.e. hand, foot, heart, lungs, etc.) where you can leave your own notes for the saint.
6 - GIFT SHOP: Close to the entry and parking lot, there is a small gift shop where you can purchase some religious items pertaining to St. Gerard - medals, bookmarks, jewelry, books, etc. Unfortunately, there was only 1 small pamphlet written in English - the rest was in Italian. Here, you can also buy a St. Gerard handkerchief (for I think 2 Euros) to protect mothers and children. The gift shop is closed daily between 1 pm - 3 pm.
St. Gerard's handkerchief story is as follows: While he was leaving the house of a family he had gone to visit, he dropped his handkerchief. A young woman retrieved it, but as she handed it to him, Gerard told her mysteriously, "Keep it. One day it will be of service to you." Although puzzled, the woman did keep it. And a few years later, she faced life threatening complications as she was about to give birth to her first child. She remembered the mysterious hanky and the promise, and asked that it be brought to her in her travail. She held it to her womb and immediately the pain ceased and she delivered a normal, healthy child. The miraculous handkerchief was passed from mother to mother as they were about to give birth in the town of Olive to Citra. The first mother passed the precious relic on to her niece and on it went through the generations.
This is a wonderful religious experience in remembrance of St. Gerard. I definitely left feeling closer to the Saint, and more enlightened about his life and miracles.

6. Santuario di Montevergine

Via Santuario | Loc. Montevergine, 83013, Mercogliano, Italy
Excellent
65%
Good
27%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 507 reviews

Santuario di Montevergine

Reviewed By Antonio S - Sydney, Australia

whilst visiting family in Napoli we decided to visit this breath taking sanctuary. The drive up a long swerving road with the towering chestnut trees alongside the road was a delight. we reached the top of montevergine & the view of Avellino down bellow was Breathtaking. The colossal Church / Sanctuary just left me breathless. when my uncle told me the history of the Sanctuary & how my ancestors used to walk up or ride carts pulled by donkeys to reach this spiritual place i immediately felt a strong respect and spiritual connection to the place. The Painting of the Madonna left me in awe of a man being able to produce such beauty on a slab of pine wood.

7. Azienda vinicola Feudi di San Gregorio

Cap 83050 Localita Cerza Grossa, Sorbo Serpico, Italy +39 0825 986611
Excellent
79%
Good
19%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 86 reviews

Azienda vinicola Feudi di San Gregorio

Reviewed By Farabundo - Moscow

The modern style winery? It is, moreover - built by Japanese architect. Stylish spaces, very unusual cellar with no side walls but pillars. Very interesting Taurasi and Piano di Montevergine Taurasi (both - Aglianico). Also white - Pietracalda (Fiano di Avellino), Cutizzi (Greco di Tufo) and Serrocielo (Falanghina).
But most important - they are very friendly. It was pleasure to talk to Carmela. Thanks for openness and hospitality!

8. Cantine Antonio Caggiano

Strada Comunale Sala 4, 83030 Taurasi, Italy +39 0827 74723
Excellent
77%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 85 reviews

Cantine Antonio Caggiano

It is one of the most spectacular wineries in Campania: you can walk astonished between tens of thousands of bottles arranged in recesses extracted from the stones walls. You can see everywhere the wine oaks where they make the great wines of Taurasi, such as Macchia dei Goti, Salae Domini and Tauri, perfect. The founder, Antonio Caggiano, has been for years a passionate and enthusiastic photographer travelling all around the world: from the cold of the Artic lands to the African desert, from the United States to South America and eventually from the old family vineyard (Salae Domini) to the works for the realization of his winery that began in 1990. Antonio decides to found his company pushed by an irrepressible desire to give voice to the history and traditions of his loved Taurasi. The distinctive trait of his spectacular winery is soon clear walking by the numerous fascinating small tunnels: it is not just a place in which barrels, bottles and vats are stored but a real museum of the viticulture. In every corner, on each wall and in the multiples recesses obtained from the stones walls, it is possible to see typical tools and utensils used by the winemakers. Together with the tools and the barrels, you can find a variety of wood, glass and stone artworks, some realized by Antonio himself and some others given as a gift by artist friends. They make the atmosphere even more evocative. Nowadays the company is run by Antonio’s son Giuseppe, called Pino by everyone who, helped by his father, thanks to a meticulous work in the vineyard and a passionate and precise wine interpretation, contributed to the achievement of a qualitative and characteristic style that has marked Antonio Caggiano’s company as a big interpreter of the Irpinia wines.

Reviewed By Jonathan B - Sewell, New Jersey

I've been drinking Caggiano's Taurasi wine for many years and always reach for his above others from the region. I was supposed to see him 2 years ago but our plans that day got cut short so we never made it there. I had been emailing Antonio and his son Giuseppe the past 2 years about coming to visit as well as to congratulate them on winning an award from the Italian Sommeliers Society for the best red wine in Italy (A huge honor beating more traditional wine regions). Antonio spent a lot of time with us and we shared stories of passionate wine making and his photography. I've been to many cellars in my travels and his was by far one of the most interesting in combining art, history, and wine making. His wines are the best, the staff there were terrific, and they make it a very enjoyable visit. We didn't want to leave. If you pick one place to visit in the Taurasi region go here and ask to speak to Antonio himself. Tell them I sent you.

9. Lago Laceno

Altopiano del Laceno, 83043, Bagnoli Irpino, Italy
Excellent
44%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
15%
Poor
5%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 237 reviews

Lago Laceno

Reviewed By Simon D - Hockley Heath, United Kingdom

Visited in late September between the summer 'low' season and the winter skiing. Felt a bit like a ghost town but that didn't matter at all, it was so pretty. The lake was low, presumably suffering from a dry summer, but there are some wonderful walks to be had. We followed the purple trail, which more or less follows the track of the chair lift.What a pity that wasn't working, but no surprise as we were the only visitors in town. Had a long and very interesting chat with the owner and engineer behind the chair lift and the ski runs. We are not skiers but it would be lovely to see in winter. The Alpine meadow around the village was full of cattle with bells on their necks. Apparently people refer to this as Little Switzerland, and it's easy to see why

10. Castello Normanno

Via Castello 29, 83031 Ariano Irpino, Italy
Excellent
59%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 94 reviews

Castello Normanno

Reviewed By GGreenb - Durham, NC

Challenging to reach here (Google guided us to drive through a street-market, a murderous proposition!)...
Surrounding park is idyllic, with school groups (with nuns & parents trying to control these) and beautiful view of valley & far farms & wind-turbines.
Found no opportunity to enter/tour, but enjoyed the view of the community at leisure and the local resources for relaxation & casual outdoor recreation.

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