Top 10 Things to do in Ancona, Italy

July 23, 2017 Velvet Champine

Ancona (Italian pronunciation: [aŋˈkoːna] ( listen); Greek: Ἀγκών – Ankon (elbow)) is a city and a seaport in the Marches region in central Italy, with a population of around 101,997 as of 2015. Ancona is the capital of the province of Ancona and of the region. The city is located 280 km (170 mi) northeast of Rome, on the Adriatic Sea, between the slopes of the two extremities of the promontory of Monte Conero, Monte Astagno and Monte Guasco.
Restaurants in Ancona

1. Baia di Portonovo

Portonovo, Ancona, Italy +39 071 801562
Excellent
75%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 198 reviews

Baia di Portonovo

Reviewed By Michel A - Gatineau, Quebec

This beach is typical of several on this part of the Adriatic Coast with round pebbles and sharp drop into the water - wear sandals or beach shoes. Lounge chairs are available for a fee, as well as a good variety of ocean toys including kayaks, pedal boats, paddle boards, etc. The bar offers light snacks and a variety of drinks at a reasonable cost for a beach resort. Breathtaking views of the ocean - the beach is located on a point of land so that you can actually watch the sunset to one side and the moon rise on the other. Public washrooms and showers provided. We were here in early September when the weather is sunny and warm, and the vacation crowds are gone - we had the beach almost to ourselves. Prices are also considerably lower than in July (example, a lounge chair rents for 30 Euros in July vs. 5 Euros in August).

2. Riviera del Conero

Numana, Italy
Excellent
60%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
2%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 767 reviews

Riviera del Conero

Reviewed By Grandview301 - Melbourne

The views from Numana Alta are simply stunning and as Alex F has indicated, Sirolo is very worthwhile too. It is an easy walk there from Numana.
You will be blown away by the views from both these locations. Both have quaint piazzas and great restaurants etc... from which to dine.

3. Chiesa Santa Maria

60129 Portonovo, Ancona, Italy +39 075 500 9658
Excellent
80%
Good
16%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 207 reviews

Chiesa Santa Maria

Reviewed By Hennie100 - Rijswijk, The Netherlands

Visited this little church because of what I had read about it through TA. Even though it is indeed a lovely small pure little church, it was also a bit disappointing. In September it is only open for several hours at the end of the afternoon and at the end of the week. And it is a pity there is a gate around it. It may be necessary, but does spoil it a bit.

4. Cattedrale San Ciriaco

Piazzale del Duomo, 60121, Ancona, Italy +39 071 52688
Excellent
67%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 800 reviews

Cattedrale San Ciriaco

Reviewed By VoxItalia - Rome, Italy

Founded around 386 BC, Ancona is not a "tourist town", and this makes it a nice place to visit.
It is a quick and easy drive from the center of Ancona to see the Cathedral of San Ciriaco of Ancona, but if you prefer to walk, the approx. 1.7 KM uphill walk to the12th- to 13th-century Duomo can be a trek, but it is worth it!
The Duomo stands high on the Guasco hill overlooking Ancona’s gulf, port and natural harbor.
One can admire the imposing façade of the Duomo and enjoy the sweeping views of the city and the Adriatic sea and the port.
Someone here mentioned that the view of the port "spoils" this visit, and nothing could be further from the truth.
Ancona is a port town, and the port is a place of work for many italians and foreigners, and it tells the story of what was once one of the most important ports in Europe.
Although no longer as important as it once was, the port of Ancona it is still a busy marketplace, with many large ships travelling daily to and from Croatian and Greek ports on the Adriatic.
Dedicated to S. Ciriaco, the Cathedral is the greatest monument in Ancona and one of the most interesting medieval churches of the Marches. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Ancona.
It is shaped in an harmonious and articulate Romanesque body of a Greek cross, with elements of Byzantine and Gothic influences, reflecting the long period of construction that lasted from sec. XI to XIII.
On top of an italic type temple, erected in the third century. B.C. and probably dedicated to the patron of navigation, Aphrodite Euplea (it is also said to occupy the site of a Roman temple of Venus and incorporates the remains of a basilica of the 5th–6th century), was built in the fourth century a basilica dedicated to St. Lorenzo, which was then rebuilt and enlarged in the ninth century after the Saracen destruction, and turned a Greek cross between the XI and XII centuries.
The many restorations have given back to the temple its austere and elegant lines, after the damages suffered during the two world wars and the earthquake of 1972.
The facade in the rare white and pink stone of the Conero Mountain has a portal rich in gothic reliefs ( XIII century), preceded by a Romanesque-Gothic porch adorned with two large red marble lions.
These two staues have been exposed for centuries to the harsh sea air and mist, and they are somewhat corroded, and bleached almost pink by the bright sun, and yet they are still magnificent.
Above the portal is a large oculus with a Romanesque frame between two single mullioned windows.
Inside, the Greek cross shape with three naves of Roman columns with Byzantine capitals; at the center, supported by four strong pillars and spandrels adorned with architectural decorations and four figures of angels in relief is the twelve-sided dome, one of the most ancient in Italy.
Through a glass floor, created during one of the restorations, are visible the remains of a pagan temple and the early Christian basilica with mosaic fragments.
The Duomo has many beautiful sculptures, bas-reliefs, screens and pieces of art to admire, as well as some elaborately painted wooden cielings and the magnificent altar of Our Lady by Luigi Vanvitelli (1738) .
The right crypt is used for burial of the bishops and gives access to the underground temple, where excavations have unearthed the remains of the Italic temple and the early Christian basilica.
Anyone who wishes to drive to the Duomo at night will find the church closed, but the view of the port at night is lovely, and the sea air is wonderful.

5. Chiesa Santa Maria della Piazza

Piazza Santa Maria, 60121, Ancona, Italy +39 329 159 5150
Excellent
66%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 153 reviews

Chiesa Santa Maria della Piazza

Reviewed By SimonSandra N - Sydney, Australia

The S.Maria Della Pizza didnt get a mention in our guide book, but was a pleasant surprise. It was closed on the day we were there but was able to walk around. The architecture is still grand, even though you can tell it has been recently restored (a few hundred years ago)

6. Arco di Traiano

Molo Nord, 60121, Ancona, Italy
Excellent
54%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 200 reviews

Arco di Traiano

Reviewed By Caroline S - London, United Kingdom

This Roman arch is very impressive although slightly at odds with its surroundings on the edge of the modern ferry port - however I felt in a way it added to its charm! I thought it was wonderful to be able to walk under such an impressive monument that is almost 2000 years old (but then I am a history buff). It would be nice to have a bit more information about the arch at the site ................ also that it's companion arch (Arco Clementino) is a modern addition (1738). All this information is available in the very informative Itinerario Storico available from the Tourist Office.

7. Monumento ai Caduti

Piazza Quattro Novembre 1, 60123, Ancona, Italy
Excellent
51%
Good
40%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 344 reviews

Monumento ai Caduti

Reviewed By Judy R - Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

A leisurely walk down the tree-lined Vaile della Vittoria leads to the Monumento ad Caiduti, a striking monument overlooking the Adriatic. A short walk down the many stepped path leads through the park area leads to the water's edge.

8. Piazza del Plebiscito di Ancona

Piazza del Plebiscito, 60121, Ancona, Italy
Excellent
39%
Good
46%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 268 reviews

Piazza del Plebiscito di Ancona

Reviewed By Sophia S - Island of Hawaii, Hawaii

I was there in March and it was very nice, quiet and romantic. We stopped one evening to eat at one of the restaurants in the piazza and we liked the atmoshpere. There were not many tourists, it was not cold either and we walked along the buildings; we discovered some statues, some great architecture and that old,medieval air that you feel in many places in Italy. All in all, we liked it.

9. Museo Tattile Statale Omero

Banchina Giovanni da Chio 28 | Mole Vanvitelliana, 60121, Ancona, Italy +39 071 281 1935
Excellent
69%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 80 reviews

Museo Tattile Statale Omero

A unique barrier-free museum, whose aim is to export its experience and philosophy by promoting a multi-sensory enjoyment of art. Housed in the Eighteenth-century rooms of the Mole Vanvitelliana, Ancona, the Museo Omero can be seen as a three-dimensional encyclopaedia of art history. The collection covers all the main periods of sculpture and plastic arts: it has casts taken from original Classical Greek masterpieces, sculptures by Michelangelo as well architectonic scales of Partenone and Basilica di San Pietro. Several are the original works by contemporary sculptors such as De Chirico, Marini, Martini, Messina, Pistoletto and many others. The Museum is a centre for training and research, a permanent workshop for the promotion and enjoyment of works of art, the champion of tactile Exhibitions of national and international importance, thematic Exhibitions, and it provides learning services for schools and families. Free admssion.

Reviewed By ivkovicclan - Ancona, Italy

There's a great new way to explore a museum, by touching it! The staff was very kind and everything was satisfying. Apparently the museum was meant first for blind people, being 'tattile', but everyone enjoys it. Recommended!

10. Fontana del Calamo

Corso Giuseppe Mazzini, 60121, Ancona, Italy
Excellent
27%
Good
54%
Satisfactory
15%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 119 reviews

Fontana del Calamo

Reviewed By SteveJacksonnufc - Gateshead, England

This sight is relatively small and there's not a real lot to see when you get there but it is a fascinating Fountain and one which is pretty unique in terms of how it flows. The thirteen masked faces spouting water all in a line is a wonderful thing to see and supposedly represents thirteen people who were beheaded. The sixteenth century Fountain is a must see in Ancona and with it being centrally located just off Piazza Roma is easily found. There are plenty of shops and restaurants in the immediate vicinity meaning this can be viewed along with spending an hour or two in the area.

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