The 10 Best Things to Do in Sierra Vista, United States

February 25, 2018 Franklyn Hardiman

Sierra Vista is a city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. As of the 2010 census the population of the city was 43,888. The city is part of the Sierra Vista-Douglas Metropolitan Area, with a 2010 population of 131,346. Fort Huachuca, a U.S. Army post, is located in the northwest part of the city.
Restaurants in Sierra Vista

1. Brown's Canyon Trail

Ramsey Canyon Rd, Sierra Vista, AZ
Excellent
65%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 39 reviews

Brown's Canyon Trail

Reviewed By Ron S

Brown Canyon Ranch sits right next to the suburban area extending south from Sierra Vista. A network of trails extends out from the ranch house, some in the flat grasslands, some heading into Brown Canyon. The area right around the ranch gets heavy use. The canyon trail is a popular area for both hikers and mountain bikes. This creates hazards at times when unwary hikers and adrenaline seeking bike riders meet. The trail goes through all the way up to Ramsey Canyon. There is a spring, historic structures and beautiful views along the way.

I highly recommend this trail as well as the historic ranch. However, be aware that on weekends it is CROWDED. Watch out for bikers coming downhill fast. And, bring a camera for the beautiful scenery.

2. Sierra Vista Farmers Market

3105 E Fry Blvd, Thursdays 10am-2pm, Sierra Vista, AZ 85635-2902 +1 520-678-2638
Excellent
47%
Good
41%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 53 reviews

Sierra Vista Farmers Market

Reviewed By donnarv2017 - Sierra Vista, Arizona

Don't miss out on a prime example of what a farmer's market should be. Many of the vendors, new and with years of experience, have been featured in the bi-monthly publication: EDIBLE BAJA. The magazine by itself is one-of-a-kind, picked up for free at the...MoreThank you for support and kind comments!

3. Brown's Canyon Ranch

Ramsey Canyon Rd, Sierra Vista, AZ
Excellent
47%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
5%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 55 reviews

Brown's Canyon Ranch

Reviewed By Tumblweed22 - Sierra Vista, Arizona

As part of the history of the old west... Browns Canyon Ranch played a big part.
This ranch has been preserved and is quite an interesting history lesson.
The area around the ranch has hiking trails and picnic areas. And don't forget the beautiful views. A very nice day trip.

4. Garden Canyon

Sierra Vista, AZ +1 520-538-8740
Excellent
68%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
4%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 43 reviews

Garden Canyon

Flycatchers, quail and woodpeckers are found in this canyon.

Reviewed By breezy779 - Phoenix, Arizona

OK, we heard about the wildlife and beauty in Garden Canyon and were excited to visit. As we drive in from the entrance off Hatfield, we should have stayed in the furthest right lane to go to the visitor check in and get a badge. It's a process that takes a few minutes and requires your photo ID and completing a form. Once through, there was little information that we could find about how to get to Garden Canyon, virtually no signs on the 73,000 acre army base. We asked folks and mostly no one knew. Finally after an hour of searching and phone calls to the base itself, we found our way. From the entrance, take Hatfield Road ()the one you entered on) all the way to Irwin, take a left and take Irwin to the stop sign at Winrow. Continue across on Irwin and the road will become a dirt road. Continue following it around to the paved Garden Canyon (not marked) go left and go another 10 miles to top of Garden Canyon. You will past 3 old picnic areas. The road will become a non maintained dirt road. When you come to the bridge on the right at the top of the canyon (past the upper picnic area) you will see a sign for the pictographs. You can cross the bridge and go up a few steps to view. On the left side of the road are more pictographs and rappelling cliffs (no longer for use) The scenery is beautiful and we stopped along the way for wildlife and floral viewing. A local advised us the Canyon has been closed for the last two years due to a flood a few years back. It was open and gorgeous. I could have stayed longer in this secluded, tucked away gem. We saw deer, antelope, roadrunners, multiple birds and butterflies. The highlight was a doe and her two babies sprinting through the meadow.

5. Carr Canyon

Carr Canyon Rd, Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista, AZ
Excellent
82%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 16 reviews

Carr Canyon

Reviewed By conniegum - Hereford, AZ

I live five miles from Carr Canyon Road and its beauty. The lower canyon has a popular picnic area, further up is the Carr House and its ruins (popular with photographers and people wanting a short walk through a meadow), and higher up along the road one has breathtaking vistas of the nearby San Pedro Valley. It's all free, too!

I belong to a local meet-up that walks up the road every Tuesday at 9am (8am in the summers). We start at the bridge just past the Carr House and walk the 2.2 miles to the middle falls. In the spring, after abundant rains, one can hear the Arizona tree frogs (they sound like goats!) and at night we've seen nighthawks, bats and glowworms. Bears,bobcats and coatimundi have also been spotted higher up the road. Walk higher up to four miles and one reaches the upper falls at the end of the first group camp site. This is an old mining area, so be careful where you step! Even higher up, at a gated ATV road to the left, is another mile-long trail that takes one up to the reef with even grander views of the valley. I've hiked up here to watch the moon rise plenty of times. Across the street from the group camp site is the Old Sawmill trail head. I take this trail to hike up the 9144' high Carr Peak. A half-mile up this trail is also a year-round spring for my dogs to refresh themselves in.

The Carr House and the picnic area are very popular, as is the lower falls where teens like to climb and party. That's one thing I don't like: they leave their beer cans and bottles behind! Illegals are also known to come through the picnic area at night, and a sign warning you of this danger is posted before entering the parking area. The Border Patrol is always busy in this canyon. Last month we had a "human caused" brush fire that torched one hillside but luckily was put out quickly by our firefighters. (Our last bad fire was the June 2011 Monument Fire that burned 40 homes; evidence of the fire is still visible as one drives up Carr Canyon Road).

The Forest Service patrols the area and maintains the picnic area and camp grounds. They do an excellent job keeping it clean. They will also close the road at the bridge when ice and snow are on the road. Carr Canyon is a dirt road that sees heavy erosion after heavy rains and it will be closed until all ice and snow are melted off the road. When the road is closed it becomes a popular place for us locals to walk up the road for vistas without worrying about vehicular traffic. ATVers who trespass while the road is closed will be heavily fined. Also be careful of the posted speed limit, or dogs running loose. Ranger Rick will fine your butt if he catches you!

6. Beatty's Miller Canyon Apiary & Orchard

Sierra Vista, AZ +1 520-378-2728
Excellent
57%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
2%
Terrible
13%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 45 reviews

Beatty's Miller Canyon Apiary & Orchard

The apiary, a great place to observe hummingbirds, also offers overnight accommodations.

Reviewed By Brssjunk

Even though it isn't yet time for the Migration, there was an astonishing number of different species of Hummingbirds to view. Viewing is made much easier by having a covered bleacher so you can sit and watch for hours. We were there nearly 3 hours and only left since we were getting hungry. We say Broadbilled, Anna's, White Eared, Broad tailed, lots of Magnificients, Rufous, Black Chin and perhaps others that we haven't identified yet. If you are into bird photography, the place is great. There are about 10 feeders there and since they are bouncing back and forth between the feeders, there is a lot of opportunity to get them in flight and in the trees above the feeders. (They do not permit tripods, studio set ups, or hyper long lens in the viewing area, but they aren't needed since the birds are so close. I used an 18-270 lens and was able to get some very good images.)

We arrived at about the same time a class was out from U of A, and despite being there with about 25 other people, we were still able to get great veiws and good photos. We stayed after the class left, and felt no pressure to leave from the owner.

The owner was up with the group the entire time and Tom was helping to point out the different species and when not everyone could see, he moved a couple of the feeders to get the birds to come in closer.

There is a short hike up the hill, but it has steps and has a rope for those that feel insecure on the climb.

There is a $5 per person fee for going in, but that is used to defray the cost of the sugar water and of maintaining the property for visitors. It is well worth it.

7. Sierra Vista Visitor Center

3020 E Tacoma St, Sierra Vista, AZ 85635-1390 +1 800-288-3861
Excellent
78%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 9 reviews

Sierra Vista Visitor Center

Reviewed By NYU62 - Tucson Arizona

We love this Visitor Center, and always make this our first stop when we go to Sierra Vista. Lots of brochures, maps and information, and the staff here is so very knowledgeable and helpful. They can advise you on day trips, where to find what, and how to get somewhere. The Rest Rooms are clean, and there is plenty of parking.

Once, you arrive at Sierra Vista, there are many signs pointing the way, as it is in a bit of an out of the way area. The beautiful Library is almost next door, and the Friends of the Library have a wonderful bookshop (low prices and good books) in one adjoining room. So, a visit to the Center can be easily combined with a book shopping spree.

The information in the Visitor Center is constantly updated, so if you have brochures from 2013, you will find current ones here. This place is well worth a stop.

8. Henry F. Hauser Museum and Gift Shop

2930 E Tacoma St, Sierra Vista, AZ 85635-1352 +1 520-439-2306
Excellent
73%
Good
0%
Satisfactory
27%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 11 reviews

Henry F. Hauser Museum and Gift Shop

Reviewed By BarbJensen - Sierra Vista, Arizona

This small space is transformed continuously to reflect the history of Sierra Vista and Cochise County. Special theme displays are interesting to locals and visitors alike. I first stopped here when they had toys on display. My grand-daughter loved it. In addition, the museum sponsors special events throughout the year geared to educating the youth of the city.

9. Sierra Vista Public Library

2600 E Tacoma St, Sierra Vista, AZ 85635-1352 +1 520-458-4225
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 5 reviews

Sierra Vista Public Library

Reviewed By donnarv2017 - Sierra Vista, Arizona

In all our travels, we have never seen/visited a uniquely designed library like this one. No wonder it is used so much. There are public computers for travelers, a wonderful coffee shop that offers a lunch/snack menu for everyone, including children. The foods are home-cooked, many natural/organic, including home-made vanilla bean ice cream! The library offers many programs for children and is part of the Cochise County library system. We find first books by popular authors, even some written 20 years ago.

10. The Presidio of Santa Cruz de Terrenate

Sierra Vista, AZ
Excellent
18%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
46%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 11 reviews

The Presidio of Santa Cruz de Terrenate

Reviewed By Jim B - Tucson, Arizona

Yes there is just such a place and it is nearly 250 years old. About 1776, right when USA was fighting England for independence, Spain was expanding her frontier here in the Southwest. Our seasoned native Apache people had much to say about this as "the Presidio of Santa Cruz de Terrenate" had a mere 4 years of existence before pulling out. The Apache raided the outpost mercilessly and gained many free horses in the process.

The remains of all this action can still be traced, even the battlement is visible. Don't expect a 6 Flags presentation, this is history as it is left to us by time. It is worthwhile for the Southwest buff or birder or hiker. I hiked up the railroad in July, temperature was 110F. I do not recommend this.

I do recommend a visit. It is a thoughtful, quiet place. It is protected by the federal government so pot hunting is out of the question.

ThingsTodoPost © 2018 All rights reserved.