The 10 Best Things to Do in Seymour, United States

July 22, 2017 Oliva Fomby

Seymour is a town located in western New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 16,540 at the 2010 census. Seymour is surrounded by the communities of Ansonia and Derby to the southeast, Beacon Falls to the north, Woodbridge to the east, and Shelton and Oxford to the west.
Restaurants in Seymour

1. Jones Family Farm

606 Walnut Tree Hill Rd, Shelton, CT 06484-2099 +1 203-929-8425
Excellent
66%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
2%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 196 reviews

Jones Family Farm

We offer a variety of seasonal crops: * Strawberries in June/July * Blueberries in July/Aug * Pumpkins and Squash in October * Christmas Trees from Thanksgiving to Christmas Additionally, we have some on-site activities with our Winery and Harvest Kitchen Cooking Studio. * Winery Tasting Room is open mid-March through December, closed January till mid-March. Visit our website for hours of operation as they expand through the months into summer and fall. * Harvest Kitchen Cooking Studio is open late March through December for scheduled educational events. Visit our website for list of upcoming events for both Cooking Education and Wine Education Classes that you can register for online. Jones Family Farms consists of 3 farm locations in Shelton that are in close proximity, but with unique street addresses as you plan your visits. * Homestead Farm - 606 Walnut Tree Hill Road * Pumpkin Seed Hill Farm - 120 Beardsley Road * Valley Farm - 555 Walnut Tree Hill Road History Established in 1850. Jones Family Farms, nestled in the White Hills of Shelton, with its 19th century dairy barn and homestead farmhouse, impresses the visitor as a peaceful and relaxed living environment. The beautiful countryside with its orderly rows of Christmas trees, neat stonewalls, and well-maintained fields are the result of efforts by seven generations of Jones family farmers. The farmers of the 400-acre working farm invite families to visit and harvest seasonal crops. Presently under cultivation are 200 acres of Christmas trees, 15 acres of strawberries, 15 acres of blueberries, and 25 acres of pumpkins, gourds and squash. The Jones farmers harvest these crops from three different farm locations known as the Homestead Farm, the Valley Farm, and Pumpkinseed Hill. The farm also manages 50 acres of hay land and 50 acres of woodlots. Over five acres of grapes are in production for the farm's winery.

Reviewed By Andres72423 - Bridgeport, Connecticut

Off to our annual visit to Jones Farms to get our two Christmas tree. The season just opened and we were there early in the morning to get our trees. Best time to go to beat the post-Thanksgiving rush. The staff is always very helpful...MoreThanks for the summary Andres! It looks like you cover a lot of ground on your visit! We are happy to help you start celebrating the traditions of the Christmas season!

2. Ansonia Nature & Recreation Center

10 Deerfield Ln, Ansonia, CT 06401-2630 +1 203-736-1053
Excellent
65%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 14 reviews

Ansonia Nature & Recreation Center

Reviewed By Gloria H - Fairfield, Connecticut

This was first visit here. I had recently read about the newly installed playground and it sounded really nice. My granddaughter loved playing there. The wooden play set is quite large with lots to do. There are a number of slides, climbing areas, swings, a swing tire. The area has lots of shade too. We will definitely return. In addition there are walking trails and a nature center building too.

3. Southford Falls State Park

Route 188 and Hull's Hill Rd., Oxford, CT 06478 +1 203-264-5169
Excellent
67%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 48 reviews

Southford Falls State Park

Reviewed By Nathan C - Indianapolis, United States

Really nice place for a short hike with waterfall and covered bridge! You can grab some very nice photo-ops with this state park!

4. Derby Greenway

Division Street, Derby, CT
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 10 reviews

Derby Greenway

Reviewed By edfc - Connecticut

The Derby Greenway is approx. 3.5 miles long. You are able to park easily in Bj's parking lot and walk across the street. The beginning of the greenway is up a small incline and it is easy to walk. At about the 3/4 mile mark you cross under Route 34 and when you emerge on the other side you will not believe where you are. The area is forested with ponds and wildlife. You can either complete the loop and return or go under the Route 8 bridge and take several pedestrian bridges to downtown Derby. The entire walk is on a wide paved path and if you are not up to walking the entire path even a short walk is wonderful. Bikes are allowed but pets are not which makes for a nice clean path with no surprises along the way

5. Whitlock's Book Barn

20 Sperry Rd, Bethany, CT 06524-3530 +1 203-393-1240
Excellent
86%
Good
14%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 7 reviews

Whitlock's Book Barn

Reviewed By jaseaton - Silver Spring, Maryland

Whitlock's has been around for 50+ years. Even back in the 70's it was special, but these days, when used bookstores are either small & specialty, filled with airport reading trash (e.g. Library book sales), or non-existent, it's practically one of a kind. The barn IS a barn, situated way out in the middle of nowhere. The surrounding landscape is beautiful; the books go on and on; there are countless corners in which to hole up with a book. There's absolutely nothing commercial about the place, but neither is it stuffy or high-falutin. You can spend an hour or a day in happy communion.

1111 Chapel St, New Haven, CT 06510-2301 +1 203-432-0600
Excellent
86%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 786 reviews

Yale University Art Gallery

Yale University Art Gallery is the oldest college art museum in America. The Gallery’s encyclopedic holdings of 200,000 objects range from ancient times to the present day and represent civilizations from around the globe. FREE and open to the public. On December 12, 2012, the Yale University Art Gallery celebrated the grand opening of the renovated and expanded museum. The expanded Gallery transforms the visitor experience of both the museum and its esteemed collections. The project united the 1953 modernist structure designed by Louis Kahn, the 1928 Old Yale Art Gallery, and the 1866 Street Hall into one continuous structure while maintaining the distinctive architectural identity of each.

Reviewed By kzsull01 - Windsor, Connecticut

My husband and I visited the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut on Sunday, March 4th, 2018. This museum is excellent and offers a comprehensive view of various types of art. It has quite an impressive and beautifully curated collection of objects. We have visited this museum multiple times in the past and have always found it to be very enjoyable, interesting and educational. Each different type of art on display is in its own gallery, usually having multiple rooms, and has a very nice overview describing the art as well as such aspects as its historical, cultural, political and religious impact, depending on what is applicable. We spent about an hour in the museum this time and did not see all the exhibits. Our focus this time was on the special exhibits on the fourth floor as well as a few of the galleries on the second floor that we did not have the opportunity to spend as much time in as we would have liked during our last visit. It would probably take at least four hours to see the entire museum. This museum is definitely worth the visit and has a very nice added bonus of free admission. The only drawback of this museum is that it does not offer free parking and you may have to pay to park depending upon where you park and when you come.

The ‘Japan’s Global Baroque, 1550 – 1650’ special exhibit was exquisite with elegant objects illustrating the critical role that both imported and domestic goods played in Japanese art and culture during the momentous period of the 16th and 17th centuries. The ‘Pompeii: Photographs and Fragments’ special exhibit highlights the changing representations over time of Pompeii, a city destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79 and since then frozen in time through excavation and preservation. Large-scale photographs of Pompeii are on display and show the ongoing cycles of deterioration and preservation that mark it as a living landscape. Images of reliefs, frescoes, paintings and sculptures as well as fragments of ancient Roman wall paintings and a number of other different types of domestic objects from the period and region are also displayed within this exhibit making it both very interesting and unique. Both these special exhibits were nicely done and worth seeing.

In addition to the special exhibits, we went to the second floor. On the second floor was beautiful European Art, including vibrant Italian Renaissance paintings, a gallery of Dutch Art as well as excellent paintings by such artists as Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas and many others. Also on this floor was a large collection of Asian Art, including exhibits on the ‘Line as Design in Japanese Art’, the ‘Origin of Chinese Writings’, art from the Safavid (modern day Iranian) dynasty, art of a popular, playful, and powerful Hindu god Krishna, with the ‘Krishna: The Divine Cowherd’ exhibit, and much, much more.

Below I included what we saw during our visit in late November 2017 to give highlights on the remaining galleries in the museum to provide a complete review of the entire museum and all it has to offer, which is definitely quite a bit.

On the first floor we enjoyed the African Art exhibit highlighting major themes that unite different local traditions to understand the aesthetics, meaning, and historical depth associated with this art. On display were many items, including masks, sculptures, statuettes, chairs, jewelry, ceramics, textiles and horns. This was a nicely done exhibit. Also on the first floor was Ancient American Art, with art of the Maya, from Mexico to the Andes. There was also Art of the Ancient Mediterranean with objects providing insights into politics, culture and religion, including statues, coins, wood carvings, vases, ceramic figurines, numismatic curiosities as well as many other artifacts. The next gallery on the first floor was the Dura-Europos (modern day Syria) gallery. Included was Tomb24 in the Necropolis at Dura-Europos. Also in the exhibit was armor, the shrine to the god Mithras, jewelry, pottery and textiles. In addition, there was the first known painting of the Virgin Mary and the earliest surviving house church. All the exhibits on the first floor were very interesting, enjoyable and educational, with much historical significance.

On floor 2E there was American Art before 1900, with historical paintings on the American Revolution, including George Washington at Princeton and Trenton and other paintings by John Trumbull depicting such subjects as the Declaration of Independence and the Battle of Bunker Hill. As we continued through the American Art galleries there were portrait miniatures, self-portrait prints, sculptures by Augustus Saint-Gaudens and landscape paintings of multiple places, such as, the Catskills, Niagara Falls and Mount Katahdin, all very beautiful.

There was also quite an extensive collection of American Decorative Art housed in multiple galleries, broken down into time periods, from the 17th century to the present day. In these galleries were many items, such as, furniture, including chairs, chests and highboys. There was also silver, tin glaze earthenware, pottery, dinnerware, and rooms from both a North Branford and a Hebron home, among many other items. In addition, there was an impressive exhibit on American coins, medal and silver from 1670 to the present as well as Benjamin Franklin items on display.

The third floor had an Indo-Pacific Art Gallery, with the art of maritime South East Asia, as well as a Modern and Contemporary Art and Design exhibit with paintings, including some by Pablo Picasso, sculptures, furniture and decorative arts.

We highly recommend this museum. It definitely has a lot to offer, much more than what I have mentioned here. I only provided some highlights in this write-up based on our experience during our visit. We hope that you have the opportunity to visit it and enjoy it as much as we did.

7. Kettletown State Park

1400 Georges Hill Rd, Southbury, CT 06488-2612 +1 203-264-5678
Excellent
50%
Good
40%
Satisfactory
7%
Poor
3%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 64 reviews

Kettletown State Park

Reviewed By kmp1983 - Gonzales, Louisiana

This was a nice, clean state park. Unless you're into water sports there didn't seem to be much to do, but the scenery was nice.

8. New England Brewing Company

175 Amity Rd, Woodbridge, CT 06525-2201 +1 203-387-2222
Excellent
46%
Good
51%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
3%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 26 reviews

New England Brewing Company

Reviewed By RussellJW - Falls Church, VA

Small brewery near New Haven, they have a good, but limited (7-8) selection of beers. Friendly helpful beertenders. The beers all have great sounding names like Fuzzy Duck, Combover or Weiss Trash. I found all the beer to be really good, full of flavor from the quality ingredients they use. The tap room is fairly small, with stand up tables. Lots of people coming and going after having filled their growlers. On a weekday, there was ample parking, no lines and plenty of cold beer. Recommend New England Brewing Company if you want some good locally made beer. Glad I made the effort to get here.

9. Sleeping Giant State Park

Hamden, CT +1 860-424-3000
Excellent
67%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 266 reviews

Sleeping Giant State Park

A beautiful spot to view the autumn foliage.

Reviewed By Paul M - Germany

I've been heading out to the Sleeping Giant near New Haven in Connecticut for the past few years. It's a great place to walk and hike, and if you want it a little tougher, you can veer off the prepared routes and make the going as tough as you like. Just make sure you're wearing some sturdy shoes. There are plenty of steep inclines, and a wonderful old quarry to rummage around. You can spend hours (days) exploring this massive nature reserve with its very own micro-climate. I just wish that the people who take their dogs in there would adhere to the regulations and keep them on the leash. Regardless of where you go these days, you come across selfish, irresponsible, ignorant people who think that rules and regulations don't apply to them. This is especially the case in the USA where so many people believe that they have the right to do whatever they want, regardless of the law. They ruin it for the rest of us. Cycling is also not allowed in the Sleeping Giant, but people do it anyway. Shame on them!

10. Beardsley's Cider Mill & Orchard

278 Leavenworth Rd, Route 110, Shelton, CT 06484-1811 +1 203-926-1098
Excellent
82%
Good
17%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 51 reviews

Beardsley's Cider Mill & Orchard

Reviewed By lforish - Shelton, Ct

Best pies and apple cider around. Friendly employees and very interestic products for sale in the store.

ThingsTodoPost © 2018 All rights reserved.