The 10 Best Things to Do in Cordoba, Spain

February 22, 2018 Moriah Teneyck

Córdoba was once the premier city of the Western World, the greatest metropolis west of Constantinople, and the seat of Europe’s first university. Today, there’s a modern commercial center, but most travelers love strolling the town’s ancient cobblestone streets, peeking through gates for glimpses of lush flowers and beautiful tiled fountains.
Restaurants in Cordoba

1. Mezquita Cathedral de Cordoba

Calle del Cardenal Herrero, 1, 14003 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 47 05 12
Excellent
86%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 21 reviews

Mezquita Cathedral de Cordoba

Roman Catholic church that was once a mosque. Blending many architectural styles, the structure evolved over the centuries.

Reviewed By SeeTheWorld4Peace - Manasquan, New Jersey

I was not prepared for the extent of the place, nor the rather smooth way that the Cathedral was inserted into the mosque while only destroying the innermost part. Both are quite spectacular, and the combo is very intriguing. It is amazing what constructions by both the Moslems and Christians can be inspired by religion, and executed by dictators.

2. Mezquita-Catedral De Cordoba

Calle del Cardenal Herrero 1, 14003 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 47 05 12
Excellent
82%
Good
14%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 360 reviews

Mezquita-Catedral De Cordoba

Reviewed By jmeem42016 - Sydney, Australia

Its good the Christian "reconquerors" left most of the Muslim parts of this mosque alone and simply converted it to a Cathedral. So its an excellent mix of architectures, basically Moorish but with Christian alters and chapels all around the sides. I see another reviewer thought this was a separate building to the main Mezquita Cathedral but when I checked the map it certainly seems to be the same because we walked all around it.

3. Historic Centre of Cordoba

Cordoba, Spain +34 686 99 95 67
Excellent
65%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 2 reviews

Historic Centre of Cordoba

Reviewed By Bozeman-Dublin - Dublin, Ireland

We really enjoyed a day 8n Cordoba old town centre. The obvious highkight is the Mesquita Cathedral but another highlight was just aimlessly ambling throygh the little alleys, hidden plazas and backstreets around it.
Loads of lovely little curiosity shops, eateries and bars to call into. It is much less crowded than say, Seville or Malaga and while I wouldn't go so far as to say we had the place to ourselves or anything, it was far less busy and rushed.
Some beautiful buildings and churches. A lovely place to spend a day.

4. Patios de Cordoba

Varias Calles, Cordoba, Spain +34 611 61 23 00
Excellent
69%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Patios de Cordoba

Reviewed By dick h - Derby, United Kingdom

I didn't really know what to expect, but these little gems are really worthwhile visiting. The owners of these patios have worked really hard to present them in their best possible light. Some just have flowers presented nicley up the walls, some have little historical touchs to let you know how things would have been years ago. What they all had in common were very beautiful nativity cenes.Well worth the 5 Euros!

5. Jewish Quarter (Juderia)

Cordoba, Spain +34 957 42 14 04
Excellent
57%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 4 reviews

Jewish Quarter (Juderia)

Reviewed By Graeme S

jolly nice and all that but nothing really special. worth a visit post mezquita but not in its own right IMHO.

6. Los Patios del Alcazar Viejo

Calle San Basilio 14, 14004 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 04 33 25
Excellent
65%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
7%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 278 reviews

Los Patios del Alcazar Viejo

We own seven Patios that make up the Route of the Patios of Alcazar Viejo. We have created this path so the visitor can enjoy the patios of Cordoba during much of the year and so, to finance their maintenance. Thank you for visiting.

Reviewed By DeanMurphy2020 - Orlando, Florida

Translated from Spanish, “the patios of the old alcazar” feature a stunning array of potted plants adorning stucco walls. This “patio” is what many may call a courtyard, and it’s at the Alcazar—the Moorish name for fortress. It’s a block from the Synagogue (Sinagoga), and inside a wall that has virtually no identification. It’s easily overlooked, so take care when walking. You may miss one of Córdoba’s most astounding sights.
When I saw several people manually watering each plant with extension pipes and squeezing water from a bulb, I learned a lesson. Three times a day a small amount of water is used for each pot. Water in an arid climate is scarce, so plants are not doused with garden hoses. This made me appreciate how much water Westerners waste—and how much care is rendered for each plant. I recall my grandmother half a century ago carrying a bucket of water and ladling water on each plant. Seems rural North Carolina in the late 1950s had much in common with tradition in Córdoba.

7. Capilla Mudejar de San Bartolome

Calle Averroes s/n | Anexa a Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, 14004 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 21 87 53
Excellent
72%
Good
17%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 562 reviews

Capilla Mudejar de San Bartolome

This chapel, once the parish church of San Bartolome, now forms part of the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts, the former Cardinal Salazar hospital, and is a splendid example of Mudejar architecture, built between the 14th and 15th centuries

Reviewed By ES1211 - Reading, United Kingdom

This beautiful chapel is to found in the narrow streets of the Jewish quarter, it was marked on our tourist information map and we found it without any difficulty. The parish of San Bartolome was created when the Jews were forced out of Cordoba and yet the chapel was built in the mudejar style. It was abandoned, rediscovered and restored in 1953.

8. Palacio de Viana

Plaza de Don Gome 2, 14001 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 49 67 41
Excellent
55%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Palacio de Viana

The Palace of Viana is a lived house until the end of 20th century by noble families but with a great popular flavor instead. One of its main attractiveness are the "patios" and the garden that make it be known as Museum of the Patios. Indoor and outdoor are perfectly integrated, giving to the palace an original harmony. Among the collections stand out paintings, tapestries, leather and ceramic tiles among others.

Reviewed By JLCgladstone - Surrey, United Kingdom

Initially we bought a ticket to see just the garden(10E each) but afterwards decided to ask if we could upgrade it to a guided/timed tour of the palacio ticket( 6E extra), which they did.
The patios are beautiful- on a lovely domestic( albeit palatial !)scale. Being mid March there were fewer flowers than later- also fewer visitors -but they were still lovely. Well worth seeing.
The house tour was enjoyable but it was a whistle stop tour. Tours are not given in English- you are just given a leaflet in English and I got the impression she did not give as much info as the guide gave.
We had lunch in the taberna opposite the entrance, with its Seating infront of the entrance
and it was very good. We'd had coffee earlier at the corner cafe just a few yards to the right( as you look it) of the palacio where we had the best coffee of our 3 days in Cordoba.

9. Museo Arqueologico de Cordoba

Plaza Jeronimo Paez 7, 14003 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 35 55 17
Excellent
52%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 536 reviews

Museo Arqueologico de Cordoba

September 16 to June 15: Tuesday to Saturday: from 9,00 to 20,30 hours. Sundays and festive of opening: from 9,00 to 15,30 hours. Monday closed (excluded holidays). June 16 to September 15: Tuesday to Sunday and festive: from 9,00 to 15,30 hours. Monday closed (excluded holidays).

Reviewed By macedonboy - Glasgow, United Kingdom

The museum is built on the site of a Roman theatre that was saved when it was partially hidden by a collapsed roof. The museum isn't that big and can easily be covered in about an hour. The exhibits from pre-history up to the reconquest cover all the bits in between from the early Iberian peoples to Phoenicians, Romans, Arabs and Moors.
The museum is well organised in chronological order and each section has some description in Spanish and English.
The quality of the exhibits are absolutely fantastic and it's definitely worth seeing if you're in the city. Best of all it's free to Spanish and EU nationals, so (still) free to us Brits.

10. Archaeological Ensemble of Madinat Al-Zahra

Carretera Palma del Rio km. 5,5, 14071 Cordoba, Spain +34 957 10 49 33
Excellent
55%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Archaeological Ensemble of Madinat Al-Zahra

Monday Closed

Reviewed By SlightlyDusty - SC

It is a ride out of town and has an interesting story but I wouldn't do it unless you had seen everything else. It took a lot of time and I wish I had that time back to see another attraction that I missed because I went to this one. They didn't really show you what the entire place would have looked like and although it is significant they think they have only exacted 12 percent of it. We watched the video on YouTube beciase they did have it working at the site.

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