10 Things to Do in Tahlequah That You Shouldn't Miss

January 24, 2018 Nicolette Lion

Tahlequah in United States, from Nouth America region, is best know for History Museums. Discover best things to do in Tahlequah with beautiful photos and great reviews from traveller around the world here!
Restaurants in Tahlequah

1. Cherokee Heritage Center

21192 S. Keeler Drive, Park Hill, OK 74451 +1 918-456-6007
Excellent
70%
Good
23%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 146 reviews

Cherokee Heritage Center

An independent nonprofit organization with a mission to preserve, promote, and teach Cherokee history, heritage, and culture. The center sits on 44 beautiful acres in historic Park Hill, Oklahoma and is home to the Diligwa Cherokee Village, an outdoor living history attraction, a genealogy library, and the Cherokee National Museum and Archives plus a permanent exhibit on the Trail of Tears and 1500 square feet of exhibit space with changing exhibits.

Reviewed By charles s - London, United Kingdom

The Cherokee Heritage Center includes indoor museum exhibitions, an art gallery and large gift shop. Outdoor there are authentic reproductions of traditional dwellings with rural villagers demonstrating traditional Cherokee crafts. Our guide Jeff, with his true Cherokee lineage, provided an educational, interesting and often amusing tour of the external village site to learn about the Cherokee people and their daily way of life. This included their homes, their foods and cooking methods, tools, the making of bows, arrows, using blowpipes, and playing of games. There is a small admission fee and the center is open seven days a week with car parking in the onsite grounds.

2. Cherokee National Prison Museum

124 E Choctaw St, Tahlequah, OK 74464-3918 +1 918-207-3640
Excellent
58%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 19 reviews

Cherokee National Prison Museum

The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in the entire Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced or accused prisoners from throughout the territory. It was built in 1875 and was created for the purpose of reformation as well as for punishment for offenders. The principal chief had the power to pardon condemned men, with the advice and consent of his executive council, but this was rarely exercised. Built of sandstone rock, it was, "made to hold the most hardened and dangerous prisoners."

Reviewed By MTravi - Nashville, Tennessee

Located in a former jail this museum details the law enforcement history of the area and specifically with the Cherokee nation. Lots of information about colorful characters and current information about Cherokee law enforcement given on interactive consoles. A reconstructed gallows is outside in the back, although it is roped off so you do not climb it. Next door around back are actual cells used and more stories of inmates housed there. Small gift shop available and bathrooms. Parking area is small. open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-4pm. Admission $5 or get the Compass pass. Allow about an hour to visit.

3. Riverbend Floats

15693 Ok-10, Tahlequah, OK 74464 +1 918-708-6800
Excellent
100%
Good
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Satisfactory
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Poor
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Overall Ratings

5 based on 12 reviews

Riverbend Floats

River outfitter and lodging in Oklahoma's scenic Illinois River corridor. We are located smack in the middle of the best floating and recreation area in the Oklahoma Ozarks. Come enjoy our laid back family destination!

Reviewed By Lori M - Topeka, Kansas

First time in Tahlequah . First time floating the Illinois River. Great, wonderful, friendly service!! Robbie stayed late for us to check in our first night, offered me coffee in the morning and had great recommendations once leaving and traveling on into OKC, via Route...MoreI was wondering how your trip down Rt 66 went and it appears it was good. Thanks for visiting Riverbend Floats and please come back!

4. George M. Murrell Home

19479 E Murrel Home Rd, Park Hill, OK 74451-2001 +1 918-456-2751
Excellent
56%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
0%
Terrible
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Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 18 reviews

George M. Murrell Home

Reviewed By charles s - London, United Kingdom

This historic house was built in 1845 by wealthy white planter and merchant George Murrell and his wife, interestingly, the niece of the Cherokee leader. During the American Civil War, it was the only building to survive in the local area. The house is perfectly preserved and beautifully furnished from the mid 1800’s period including artifacts from the Murrell family. It is operated as a museum by the Oklahoma Historical Society and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1974. Within the surrounding grounds there is a log cabin used for living history demonstrations of Cherokee life during the mid-19th century. In the park is the Tehlequah Historic Trail. Entry for a self-guide tour is by free entry with suggested donations, friendly knowledgeable staff are on hand for any visitor questions.

5. Northeastern State University

600 N Grand Ave, Tahlequah, OK 74464-2301 +1 918-456-5511
Excellent
65%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
7%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 14 reviews

Northeastern State University

Reviewed By Basque01 - Tahlequah, Oklahoma

They bent to political correctness instead of heritage and tradition. U graduated as a Northeastern Redman and will always remain. It has nothing to do with race or color. At one point we had a sport rider. A Native American.

6. John Ross Museum

22366 S 530 Rd, Park Hill, OK 74451 +1 918-431-0757
Excellent
45%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
33%
Poor
11%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

John Ross Museum

The John Ross Museum highlights the life of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years, and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation's passion for the education of its people. The museum also has a gift shop and research area. The museum is located adjacent to Ross Cemetery in former Rural School #51 near Park Hill, Okla. The museum was originally built in 1913 to operate as a rural school in Cherokee County just after Oklahoma statehood. The school served Cherokee and non-Cherokee students and the facility remained open through the 1950s.

Reviewed By Will E

This museum is a hidden gem off the beaten path between the Cherokee Heritage Museum and Murrell Home. Situated next to the Ross Cemetery (the final resting place of Chief John Ross and several other prominent Cherokee and survivors of the Trail of Tears). Justin was great and shared a lot about the culture of the Cherokee and especially explaining the importance of the stomp dances and how the Cherokee religion easily meshes with that of Christianity. He also explained how the Cherokee Nation is not a reservation (as is a common misconception). If you really want a lesson on the Cherokee people post removal, please do not miss this museum. I hope anyone who visits this museum has a chance to go while Justin is there. Be sure to purchase your Cherokee Compass. It comes with a free shirt and access to this museum as well as the Heritage Center, Supreme Court Museum, and the Cherokee Prison Museum. It saves you almost 50% off admissions to these museums and gives you a great souvenir as well pointing out over 100+ free things to do while you're in the Cherokee Nation.

7. Tahlequah History Trail

Tahlequah, OK
Excellent
35%
Good
55%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
5%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 17 reviews

Tahlequah History Trail

Reviewed By charles s - London, United Kingdom

This self-guided trail along a designated paved walkway provides visitors with informative history of the Cherokee nation's people and their journey and arrival in Oklahoma from Florida. The scenic trail is a well laid out through the park woods and along the waterway with interesting landmarks along the way. There are a series of ‘History Boards’ with detailed information and illustrations including, Cherokee Settlement, Franklin Castle, Seminary Hall, History of Tehlequah, Sequoyah and Capitol Square. An enjoyable outing, scenic walk and history lesson all in one.

8. Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum

122 E Keetoowah St, Tahlequah, OK 74464-3902 +1 918-207-3508
Excellent
33%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
22%
Poor
0%
Terrible
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Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum

This structure was built on the southeastern corner of Tahlequah town square in 1844 by James S. Pierce to house the Cherokee National Supreme Court. Justice John Martin was the first chief justice of the Supreme Court when it was established. The Supreme and District courts both held sessions here for some time. The building also housed the printing press of the Cherokee Advocate, the official publication of Cherokee Nation and the first newspaper in Oklahoma. It is the oldest government building in the state of Oklahoma. The Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum features pieces in three historic areas including the Cherokee National Judicial System, the Cherokee Advocate and Phoenix newspapers and the Cherokee language with a variety of historical items including photos, stories, objects and furniture.

Reviewed By MTravi - Nashville, Tennessee

This historical building once housed the Cherokee nation Supreme Court and the printing press for the Phoenix newspaper. A recreated printing press with interactive sounds is located in one of the rooms telling the story of the Cherokee newspapers which are still in print today. More rooms and artifacts are located upstairs. A computer with a Cherokee language keyboard is also on premises. Have to admit the Cherokee were smarter than our civilization. They only allow their judges ten year term limits. Nice gift shop and bathrooms available. I received a free model of the court house with purchase. Admission is $5 or get a Compass pass. Open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-4pm. Allow about an hour to visit. On street parking available. The building is right across the street from the town square where the Cherokee National Capitol building sits. You can not go in but it is nice to walk around the park like setting.

9. The Speckled Hen Antique & Flea Market

5227 S. Muskogee Ave., Tahlequah, OK 74464-5499 +1 918-458-0032
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
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Overall Ratings

5 based on 5 reviews

The Speckled Hen Antique & Flea Market

We have been located just north of the US-62/SH-82 junction on the south side of Tahlequah, Oklahoma for many years. It has been family owned and operated during this time. The store features 150+ vendors combined with 140+ booths. These vendors are the heart of our business and are experienced in offering a wide range of merchandise for almost any interest. We specialize in resale items along with antique/vintage finds. Our offerings include used books, games, toys, clothing, shoes, glassware, cast iron items, DVDs, movies, knives, jewelry, decorative and home interior items, as well as purses and handbags. We are also a good source of used furniture and occasional used appliances. There is always a little something for just about any interest on hand at any given time.

Reviewed By Cmichaelus

Always enjoy shopping at speckled hen in tahlequah. They have a wide variety of antiques and collectibles. Never know what you may find. Lots of bargains.

10. Kidz Zone Of Tahlequah

1209 S Muskogee Ave, Tahlequah, OK 74464-5213 +1 918-431-1335
Excellent
100%
Good
0%
Satisfactory
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Poor
0%
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Overall Ratings

5 based on 3 reviews

Kidz Zone Of Tahlequah

An indoor playground for kids up to age 12. There is a rock climbing wall, "The Majestic" with three slides, a bubble lookout sphere, a ball room and punching bags on two levels is a socks only apparatus, there is a Victorian Playhouse with a little kitchen and table and chairs inside, several play grocery stores with shopping carts, Super hero capes and masks, Fairy wings, tutus and tiaras. Rain or shine it's fun inside! Great for Birthday Parties, too!

Reviewed By jenicej4 - Tahlequah, Oklahoma

I am so glad the owner decided to bring this place -- Kidz Zone -- for kids to Tahlequah! We've lived here for several years and love the area, lakes, quaint downtown and campus, but always had such a hard time finding a place for our kids to play, or have birthday parties at. We kept watching the building being worked on and wondered what it was, then one day after it was open decided to go inside with my two kids. My son is 3 and my girl just turned 6. The owner gave us a tour and before I knew it, my kids were begging me to let them stay. I had to buy some socks so the kids could play inside the big apparatus called Majestic. They just ran and ran and screamed and played so hard that I had to get them to stop and drink some water that was set out on one of the tables there. I looked at the brochure and booked a birthday party for my daughter. It just took a small deposit to hold my reservation and we paid the balance at the end of the party and the party was fun for all the kids and the parents. Even my parents had a good time and said how clean the place was. I picked out pink and purple for the colors and when we got there everything was in place with pink balloons, plates, napkins, forks and purple table cloths. It was so pretty. This place is great for kids and for parents who don't want the hassle of having a party at home or taking a chance on the weather being bad. Good job Kidz Zone! Glad you came to town.

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