10 Things to Do in Sleaford That You Shouldn't Miss

January 8, 2018 Concepcion Newsome

Sleaford (historically known as New Sleaford) is a market town and civil parish in Lincolnshire, England. Since 1973, the parish boundaries have included Quarrington to the south-west, Holdingham to the north and Old Sleaford to the east – contiguous settlements and former civil parishes which, with New Sleaford, had formed an Urban District. The town is on the edge of the fertile Fenlands, about 11 miles (18 km) north-east of Grantham, 16 miles (26 km) west of Boston, and 17 miles (27 km) south of Lincoln. With a population of 17,671 at the 2011 Census, the town is the largest settlement in the North Kesteven district. Bypassed by the A17 and the A15, it is connected to Lincoln, Newark, Peterborough and King's Lynn. Sleaford railway station is on the Nottingham to Skegness (via Grantham) and Peterborough to Lincoln Lines.
Restaurants in Sleaford

1. Heckington Windmill

Hale Road, Sleaford NG34 9JW, England +44 1529 461919
Excellent
64%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
3%
Terrible
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Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 110 reviews

Heckington Windmill

One of only two working 8 sailed windmills in the world, we are now regularly milling again with grain sourced exclusively from within 5 miles of the mill itself. Ample on-site parking and toilets, guided tours available, and audio tours will soon also be available for those who visit when there are no millers on duty. There is a mouse hunt for the children, and all five floors are open to be explored. As we are going through a transition phase after our successful lottery fund application, the other buildings around the site are currently undergoing some development. Visitors who have been before please bear in mind that the professional caterers who used to run the tearooms as a separate business have now left, but to ensure visitors can still enjoy refreshment facilities our volunteers are working hard to provide basic hot & cold drinks, snacks, sandwiches etc. Opening hours: 7 days a week from 12 to 5 during school summer holidays Saturdays and Sundays from 12 to 5 the rest of the year except half term weeks, when we are also open Thursday and Friday, 12 to 5. Admission: Adults £3 Children 5-16 £1.50 Under 5's free Guided tour inclusive, subject to volunteer availability. Please check website for up-to-date news, events, and notices.

Reviewed By ianforbes2016 - Birmingham, United Kingdom

This only working 8-sailed windmill in the world is well worth a visit with access to the internal machinery. I got a warm reception from Manager Jim Bailey and his excellent knowledgeable team of volunteers. The Tearoom and on-site brewery are excellent, with a step back in time at the early 20th century dwelling on the site. I have answered yes to a restaurant as there was no option for the delicious cakes and sandwiches served in the Tea Room.
Well worth a visit.

2. Cogglesford Mill

East Road, Sleaford NG34 7EQ, England +44 1529 413671
Excellent
58%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 97 reviews

Cogglesford Mill

Cogglesford Watermill, dating back to Saxon times, is thought to be the only Sherriff's watermill still in operation in England. The Mill lies in a picturesque setting on the River Slea in the historic market town of Sleaford, Lincolnshire, close to the town centre and all its amenities. Although the present Mill was mainly built in the early 18th Century, millers have produced flour on this site for over 1,000 years. This award winning, three storey building has a low breast shot water wheel and two sets of millstones. You can watch the Mill in operation on special event days, producing stone ground flour as it would have been 200 years ago. Video footage of the milling process can be seen when the Mill is not in operation. Discover the fascinating characters and events that shaped its history from its Anglo Saxon origins to the present day. Please note this is not the TripAdvisor Page for the restaurant which is located next to the mill.

Reviewed By robbiefr - Dagenham, United Kingdom

You don't get much for free these days and parking is free for 2 hours as well so you can stroll along the canal bank as well . The mill has special days when it is working check website for details next one is 9th...MoreThank you for taking the time to write your review. We are pleased you enjoyed your visit and look forward to seeing you again soon.

3. Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum

Heath Farm | North Rauceby, Sleaford NG34 8QR, England +44 1529 488490
Excellent
62%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 61 reviews

Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum

Royal Air Force College Cranwell (the first Military Air Academy in the world) is probably the most famous landmark in Royal Air Force (RAF) history. The Cranwell Aviation Heritage Centre portrays the fascinating story of this historic establishment from its early days as a Royal Naval Air Service base to the current day. Discover the history of the RAF Cranwell/RAF College Cranwell through artefacts, story boards, displays and exhibits. Try your hand on our interactive exhibits including a flight simulator where you can attempt to land a Jet Provost on the runway at RAF Cranwell before your fuel runs out!

Reviewed By Karen F - Lincoln, United Kingdom

This is a great little museum for those interested in aviation. It is also interesting and small enough that even if you are not particularly enthusiastic about aviation there is enough to hold attention. The museum is free and there is a small drinks/ice cream...MoreThank you for taking the time to write your review. We're pleased you enjoyed your visit and look forward to seeing you again soon.

4. The Pottery Painting Cafe

19 Westgate, Sleaford NG34 7PJ, England +44 1529 307694
Excellent
90%
Good
10%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
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Overall Ratings

5 based on 28 reviews

The Pottery Painting Cafe

A friendly family run pottery painting studio where people of all ages can create their own masterpiece. Come and join us for a few hours of fun in a relaxed and informal setting.We are a breast feeding friendly cafe with baby changing facilities and high chairs too. Looking forward to welcoming you soon :-) We are closed on Mondays but We are open Tuesday to Friday from 1230pm to 1700pm and Saturdays 1000am to 1700pm, then Sunday 1230 to 1700. We are also open the first Sunday of every month from 12pm to 4pm (bookings only) and Late Night for adults (bookings only) on the first Thursday of every month 6pm - 9pm - bring a bottle :-)

Reviewed By robert j - Sleaford, United Kingdom

Areally different business venture which in its previous premises in Westbank Sleaford was too small and overcrowded.
Their move to Westgate brings a whole new facility and makes fun of both painting but adds meaning to a gift with such hand skills

5. Sleaford Museum

81 Southgate, Sleaford NG34 7RQ, England +44 7518 972016
Excellent
79%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
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Poor
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Overall Ratings

5 based on 19 reviews

Sleaford Museum

Reviewed By 2014Jandy - Nottingham, United Kingdom

Visited this lovely small museum as we spotted it as we were walking along the main shopping street in Sleaford. We were here for the Heritage Open Day but didn't know this was here. A great welcome from two very knowledgeable gentlemen who gave us a brief history of Sleaford and what we could see in the museum. Don't be fooled it is a lot bigger than it looks and has lots of local information and things to see.
It is very bright inside so you can see things easily. A most enjoyable visit and we will return as its one of those places that you will find interesting even after a couple of visits.

6. National Centre for Craft & Design

Navigation Wharf Carre Street | Carre Street, Sleaford NG34 7TW, England +44 1529 308710
Excellent
34%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
17%
Poor
3%
Terrible
10%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 97 reviews

National Centre for Craft & Design

From small seeds has grown a superb national centre. In the beautiful setting of Navigation Wharf in Sleaford sits an old seed warehouse. But it’s not what you’d expect, for this converted warehouse is home to British craft and design. We are the largest venue in England entirely dedicated to the exhibition, celebration, support and promotion of national and international contemporary craft and design. Under one roof, our five gallery spaces showcase up to 20 world-class Exhibitions every year from the most innovative, challenging and accomplished artists to new and emerging talent. Our stimulating learning programme inspires people of all ages, skills and interest levels and our shop is a cultural haven for the latest contemporary handmade products. We are also home to Design Factory, the UK’s leading professional development organisation for British designer-makers and artsNK, the country’s largest rural arts development agency that specialises in visual and performing arts projects.

Reviewed By Mary H - Stamford, United Kingdom

We have lived in Lincolnshire for 37 years yet only just discovered this exciting centre. We were lucky enough to find a display of willow sculptures which was the highlight of our visit, with a book telling the thinking and preparation behind each exhibit, although...MoreHi Mary, I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to leave a review, we value all feedback and we're always pleased to hear when people have enjoyed their visit so much. We look forward to welcoming you again soon.

7. St Denys' Church

St. Denys Church Room Market Place, Sleaford NG34 7SH, England +44 1529 413607
Excellent
67%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
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Poor
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Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 18 reviews

St Denys' Church

Reviewed By 2014Jandy - Nottingham, United Kingdom

St Deny's church is right in the heart of Sleaford in the market place. There is a pay and display car park directly outside. We were amazed just how big this parish church is and it has lovely stained glass windows. The church building is lovely and just walking around the church and churchyard is so interesting. If you like historic buildings and churches you should visit this one.

8. The Tally Ho Inn

Aswarby, Sleaford NG34 8SA, England +44 1529 455170
Excellent
46%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
0%
Terrible
11%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 18 reviews

The Tally Ho Inn

Reviewed By Peter D

We visited the Tally Ho for a birthday celebration meal on Friday. From the moment we entered we were made to feel welcome. The food was excellent with attentive but no intrusive service. A thoroughly excellent visit and we would heartily and unreservedly recommend it to others.

9. The Sleaford Playhouse

54 Westgate, Sleaford NG34 7PP, England +44 1529 663434
Excellent
58%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
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Poor
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Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 7 reviews

The Sleaford Playhouse

The Playhouse was restored to a working Theatre in 2000 and has had a varied history. Originally built as a theatre, it was subsequently adapted for a variety of other uses to meet the demands of the time, and is now once more being used for its original purpose. The Playhouse was built in 1825 for Joseph Smedley (bookbinder, printer and stationer - and comedian), who had purchased the land and surrounding tenements for £700. Smedley successfully managed the Playhouse as a theatre for several years. He owned a string of theatres from Kings Lynn around the Wash to Sleaford and ran a small touring theatre company, which toured these theatres in the Lincolnshire and Norfolk area. In January 1841, after a relatively quiet time with poor attendances at the theatre, Smedley sold the Playhouse to John Hyde (watchmaker) of Sleaford. Hyde managed the Playhouse and succeeded in attracting a variety of acts to Sleaford, including magicians, comic singers and touring theatre companies. Hyde died in June 1853, but by then he had sold the Playhouse to Jane Hill of Sleaford and William Pidd- Fischer (Miller at Money's Mill). After a short closure, they re-opened the theatre in 1855 under the management of Mr R.A. Douglas. Attendances, however, were miserably small. The taste for drama had all but disappeared in Sleaford and closure loomed again. The executors of Hill and Fisher sold the Playhouse, including fixtures and fittings, in August 1856 to Thomas Parry for the bargain price of £380. In 1857, the building was bought by the Church of England, who elected Parry, together with his business partner William Kirk, to convert it into a school that was done at a cost of £1,085.00 paid for by subscription. Thus, the Playhouse became Sleaford's first infant school. Subsequently, the Playhouse has served as a library, an emergency shelter during both world wars and a government benefits office. Sleaford Little Theatre bought the Playhouse in 1994 with a view to restoring the building to its original use. A nucleus of enthusiastic members worked hard on the project to provide the town once more with its very own theatre venue. While SLT had sufficient funds to purchase the building and carry out a certain amount of work, additional funding came from various sources, including the Foundation for Sports and Arts, Wren Recycling, local benefactors and sponsors, thus enabling the renovation to be completed. The newly restored Playhouse opened its doors to the public in October 2000, thus once more becoming a working Georgian Theatre, one of only six remaining in the country and out of those six two are with a small, rectangular auditorium. Sleaford Little Theatre now had the 'home' they'd dreamt of, and the town had an invaluable venue for all sorts of events. As the Playhouse celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2010, a refurbishment project saw the original restoration improved to include new racked Seating for the downstairs seats, new carpet downstairs making the wooden floors seem more comfortable and many more much-needed improvements. Since re-opening the Playhouse, Sleaford Little Theatre has entertained audiences with a wide variety of productions, from classics such as J.B. Priestley's 'An Inspector Calls', Daphne du Maurier's 'Rebecca' and Charles Dickens''David Copperfield', to comedies such as Lloyd & Croft's hit ''Allo 'Allo' and Alan Ayckbourn's 'Communicating Doors', plus many more. The Playhouse is proving to be a popular venue for a wide variety of other entertainment too, from local bands and solo artists to professional touring theatre companies and musicians. We aim to continue to provide an attractive range of events at the Playhouse to appeal to a wide variety of tastes, hopefully attracting new audiences as well as satisfying our existing patrons. Thank you for your support and interest in The Playhouse. We hope you've enjoyed this brief history and we look forward to welcoming you to the Playhouse.

Reviewed By Sharon S - Tattershall, null, United Kingdom

Was very suprised how many theatres Lincolnshire has,and found this one not far from me..Website is very gd with a Seating plan..Had a look through the years events and went too the Knights of comedy night...Doors opened 30 mins before show..Once inside there is a bar which gets full but a drink can be taken in the theatre...Seats very comfortable,act very gd,staff friendly and efficient...There is a car park opposite...Shall visit again if there is something on we can attend..

Navigation Wharf Carre Street | Carre Street, Sleaford NG34 7TW, England +44 1529 305904
Excellent
33%
Good
45%
Satisfactory
22%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 9 reviews

Navigation House

This impressive, refurbished original canal company office, built in 1838, is a Grade-II listed building standing in the old public wharf area, now known as Navigation Yard, off Carre Street. The building, thought to be the only one of its kind still in existence, has a heritage theme covering the early development of the new River Slea and portrays the story of the Navigation in Sleaford.

Reviewed By 2014Jandy - Nottingham, United Kingdom

Visited Navigation House and visitor centre as part of the Heritage Open Day in September. We didn't know about it before. The member of staff was very friendly and welcoming and gave us a brief history of what the house was originally used for and left us to have a look around at our own speed. There are two floors, the stairs are quite small and steep but everything is well laid out and easy to see everything. There are a few interactive exhibits which are ideal for children while you read about its past.
We really liked the snakes and ladders type game on the second floor - great for the adults too! There are a couple of rooms downstairs as well and plenty of leaflets and information of other places to visit in the area.
A very enjoyable visit. There is a large pay and display car park a short walk away and even better it is free on Sundays.

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