10 Things to Do in Papua New Guinea That You Shouldn't Miss

December 4, 2017 Jasper Kershner

Papua New Guinea from South Pacific region, is best know for Hiking Trails. Discover best things to do in Papua New Guinea with beautiful photos and great reviews from traveller around the world here!
Restaurants in Papua New Guinea

1. Kokoda Track

Papua New Guinea +675 323 6165
Excellent
95%
Good
2%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 353 reviews

Kokoda Track

Reviewed By Terry D

Commencing at Kokoda Station after a long troop carrier ride from Popondetta, our intrepid trekkers embarked on a trek following the fighting retreat our brave Australian diggers fought in August and September 1942. With numerous very challenging ascents followed by equally challenging descents we gained some appreciation of the difficulties our forebears faced fighting the Japanese army over the Owen Stanley Range. Some of the memorable moments were had at Isuarva, Brigade Hill and Ioribaiwa where significant battles occurred during the campaign.
The local Porters were incredible all trip and provided invaluable support. This is a trip that is both challenging and rewarding experience that every Australian should undertake.

2. Bomana War Cemetery

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
Excellent
79%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 220 reviews

Bomana War Cemetery

Reviewed By capsicum0620 - Thailand

Beyond the legitimate emotions this solemn place generates, this war cemetary is far from being as impressive and heart-breaking as those from the 1st and 2nd WWs in Europe. May be this is due to the general lack of information/explicative notes.
Its purposes is obviously not to teach visitors History but a more thorough description of the circumstances of those boys' sacrifice wouldn't do their memory any harm...
It does however remain one of Port-M's main points of interests.

3. Mount Tavurvur

Rabaul, East New Britain, Papua New Guinea +675 7903 1186
Excellent
69%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 72 reviews

Mount Tavurvur

Reviewed By 188petere - Brisbane, Australia

On a half day P&O volcano tour, we firstly visited the Rabaul Volcanological Observatory high on a hill overlooking Rabaul & the 2 closest active volcano's. Given a walk through tour of the Observatory including the various machines & displays, as well as various charts on display.
Then on to the boiling Springs on the bay shore, at the base of Mt Tavurvur which is still an active volcano with a recent eruption history. Very interesting seeing the power of the volcano & would have loved to have had the time to scale the mountain (next time). The past eruption ash mounds are amazing.
A local guide gave us an explanation of the mountain & its history. Very informative including that local fisherman sometimes use the thermal Springs to cook freshly caught fish or to boil eggs.
The locals had a number of stalls set up for the tourists - mixture of locals items including volcanic rocks, some local artefacts & unfortunately some mass produced tourist items.
The drive back to Rabaul shows us how much the damage was & still is including the now disused airport, resorts/hotels & the original Rabaul town.

4. Kitava Island

Papua New Guinea
Excellent
71%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 61 reviews

Kitava Island

Reviewed By Guelph_Dawn - Toronto

The small island of Kitava in the Trobriand Islands has 7,000 inhabitants in three villages. While Alotau has been touched by outside influences, Kitava truly is an intact tribal village where the people live a life unchanged for hundreds of years. They live in one room thatch houses without electricity or any regular contact with the modern world. While the locals wear modern clothing, albeit very old, they do not wear shoes and are able to walk easily through the forest and coral rocks.
P&O does not have any shore excursions on Kitava and so I would recommend doing these four things on your visit:
-Browse and purchase the carvings and souvenirs offered for sale by the islanders.
--Buy a coconut and taste the freshest, tastiest coconut water you have ever had.
-If you are fit and capable, walk the 30 minutes to the school with a local guide. You will pass traditional houses and your guide can explain and answer questions about their way of life.
-Take a traditional PNG sailing vessel 300 m across to Nuratu Island. These can be hired for 5K/person and are a thrill to experience.
-Explore underwater – there is fantastic snorkeling off the island with incredibly diverse coral.
We found the locals to be very shy and we usually had to take the lead. For instance, a local villager might come up to you and just stand with you and you might strike up a conversation. These people often had Kitava Guide shirts on and spoke English well enough to carry on a conversation. We met a man this way and asked him if he could show us around the village and the school. There was no mention of money changing hands, but of course we did pay him for his services at the end (50 Kina, which was probably too much, but we were so thankful for him answering our questions and teaching us about his culture and village).
Once ashore it becomes apparent that almost the whole island has come to the beach for the cruise ship’s arrival (our guide had walked 3 hours from his village to be there for the day). There are some school groups dressed up in traditional attire singing and accepting donations for the schools. We brought school supplies to donate. Other good items are fish hooks, clothes, sand paper and shoe polish (for the carvings). Don't bring plastic cheap toys, balloons or candy.
The school is about a 30-minute walk up a coral pathway away from the beach. Along the way and along the beach, the path was lined with people selling their carvings, shells, coconuts and palm creations. As we headed with our guide inland towards the schools, there were streams of people headed towards the beach carrying all their items on their heads, saying “hello” with welcoming smiles.
After touring around the school and village, we headed to the beautiful tropical island 300m from Kitava for some spectacular snorkeling. Locals will take you across to the island in home-made outrigger sailing canoes that our kids nick named “Moana boats” (5 Kina/person). I loved watching them put up the sails sewn together from tarps and riding in one was quite a thrill. Be prepared to possible get wet as you make your way across.
Once on the small island, you can enjoy swimming in the clear waters or go snorkeling. We found the coral to be really healthy and incredibly diverse. The coral is not far off the beach; as you move farther out, the water is clearer and coral most impressive.
On the main island there are some skull caves you can visit, which we didn’t do. There is no food for purchase except local fruits, but you can buy fresh coconuts to drinks, along with soda and local beer.

5. Mount Wilhelm

Mount Hagen, Papua New Guinea +675 7100 5432
Excellent
83%
Good
13%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
4%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 22 reviews

Mount Wilhelm

This rugged mountain, the highest in Papua New Guinea, has an excellent trail that takes hikers to the top, past lakes, Waterfalls, moss Forests, and the vestiges of a World War II American fighter bomber.

Reviewed By Nancy M - Goroka, Papua New Guinea

It was an amazing experience. I didnt make it to the top but i went more than half way. It was such an amazing experience and such a good excercise. Since I am from Papua New Guinea i will climb at least once a year.

6. Doini Island Skull Cave

Doini Island, Papua New Guinea
Excellent
41%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
21%
Poor
8%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 23 reviews

Doini Island Skull Cave

Reviewed By paug178 - Brisbane, Australia

The walk to Skull Cave was great as long as you can negotiate rough ground, crossing creek beds by walking on stones, reasonably steep general terrain and the final very steep and slightly unstable climb up to the cave itself. That said, the countryside you walk through is abundant in variations in plant and animal life with the sights and photo opportunities terrific. The islanders who gather on Doini when ships come in are very friendly people who put on various cultural displays such as dancing and tapioca preparing, with no payment required but donations are gratefully accepted, along with selling handicrafts etc. There is also the opportunity to see a cus cus up close and personal.

7. Lae War Cemetery

Memorial Avenue, Lae 411, Papua New Guinea
Excellent
55%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
6%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 15 reviews

Lae War Cemetery

Reviewed By mlkenyhercz - Lae, Papua New Guinea

It is a very manicured & well maintained to honor those soldiers who lost their lives in the war efforts. There is a sign in book which is very nice to see. Unfortunately, a few unknown soldiers are there. But the tributes are nice.

8. J.K. McCarthy Museum

Off To the Side of the Goroka Airstrip, Goroka 441, Papua New Guinea
Excellent
36%
Good
46%
Satisfactory
18%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 11 reviews

J.K. McCarthy Museum

Reviewed By WallyFL - Florida

Nice small museum with exhibits from early outside contact, World War II and early days of Goroka. J.K. McCarthy was one of PNG’s early patrol officers who wrote the classic book on New Guinea patrolling - Patrol into Yesterday.
An P-39 Aircobra aircraft is mounted on display outside the museum. Contains nice displays of weapons, both early local and those excavated after the war, great local artwork, the only thing off limits to photos is the human finger bone necklaces.
Part of the PNG National Museum system, the six display galleries include the Niugini Room, Giddings Gallery, Leahy Wing, Soso Subi Gallery and the Archaeological Room. Enjoy a couple of hours browsing here when in Goroka.

9. Kimbe Bay

Talasea Highway, Kimbe, East New Britain 621, Papua New Guinea
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 5 reviews

Kimbe Bay

Reviewed By FussyLiz - La Jolla, California

While staying at Walindi before going out on the FeBrina live aboard, we were taken to a nearby grove of trees that was full of fireflies........it was a magical evening! We also wandered around the Walindi property, visiting the schools next door built by the owners for the children of their staff and the village. The property is a botanist's dream. But the REAL highlight can only be seen in the water, both scuba diving and snorkeling. The corals and fish rate very well with the Coral Sea and Raja Ampat!

10. Port Moresby Nature Park

Goro Kaeaga Road, Port Moresby 121, Papua New Guinea +675 326 0248
Excellent
45%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 275 reviews

Port Moresby Nature Park

Port Moresby Nature Park (formerly the National Capital Botanical Gardens) is PNG's leading recreational attraction combining botanical, zoological and cultural displays. The park is home to over 250+ native animals including bird of paradise, tree-kangaroos, cassowaries, wallabies, snakes, crocodiles, hornbills and multiple parrot species. The grounds also offer a lush change from the hustle and bustle of Port Moresby City with the only rainforest tract within the Capital City. Thousands of tropical plant species including palms, gingers and heliconias and native timber tree species are found within the grounds. Facilities include cafe, souvenir shop, flower shop and arguably PNG's best children's playground. The Nature Park can arrange transportation to/from hotels and airport to the Park and offer excellent guided tours of the Park (lasting 1.5Hrs). A popular location on weekends for weddings and private picnic functions utilising the Nature Park's three large picnic areas.

Reviewed By Professional-Pilgrim - Alberta, Canada

We spent a happy couple of hours here on a Saturday morning. Surprised how few people were there. The walk-in aviaries are particularly enjoyable, with lots of birds present. The wallabies and tree kangaroos are cute, but the crocodile needs a larger enclosure.

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